Remember me - echoes from the lost generations
Debt of honour register
 
 

Most of the men and women who died at sea had ‘no known grave’ for obvious reasons. This example shows how they are remembered. To discover where they died, and possibly how, you would have to research into the history of the ship or the service records of the person involved.

Here is some information about a sailor who was lost at sea.

Casualty Details

Annotations

Name:

MARTIN, ALFRED HOWARD

 

Initials:

A H

 

Nationality:

United Kingdom

 

Rank:

Ordinary Seaman

 

Regiment:

Royal Navy

 

Unit Text:

H.M.S. "Bittern."

This is the ship on which he served.

Age:

18

 

Date of Death:

04/04/1918

 

Service No:

J/76472

 

Additional information:

Son of Alfred Martin, of Carnkie, Wendron. Welston, Cornwall.

 

Casualty Type:

Commonwealth War Dead

 

Grave/Memorial Reference:

27.

 

Cemetery:

PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL

 

 

   

The historical information section has been cut down for the purposes of this example

Cemetery Details

Cemetery:

PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL

Country:

United Kingdom

Locality:

Devon

Visiting Information:

Copies of the Memorial Register are kept at the Tourist Information Office at Island House, 9 The Barbican, Plymouth, PL1 2LS, and also in the Naval Historical Section at Plymouth Library.

Location Information:

The Memorial is situated centrally on The Hoe which looks directly towards Plymouth Sound. It is accessible at all times.

Historical Information:

After the First World War, an appropriate way had to be found of commemorating those members of the Royal Navy who had no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided. An Admiralty committee recommended that the three manning ports in Great Britain - Chatham, Plymouth and Portsmouth - should each have an identical memorial of unmistakable naval form, an obelisk, which would serve as a leading mark for shipping.

After the Second World War it was decided that the naval memorials should be extended to provide space for commemorating the naval dead without graves of that war, but since the three sites were dissimilar, a different architectural treatment was required for each.

In addition to commemorating seamen of the Royal Navy who sailed from Plymouth, the First World War panels also bear the names of sailors from Australia and South Africa; the governments of the other Commonwealth nations chose to commemorate their dead elsewhere, for the most part on memorials in their home ports.

Number of Identified Casualties:

23183

 
   
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