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Cemetery Details

# Cemetery Information

SOUTH AFRICA - CAPE TOWN (PLUMSTEAD) CEMETERY

There is the potential for attacks in the vicinity of the cemetery. All visitors are strongly advised to take care and not carry valuables or leave them on display in vehicles.

CAPE TOWN (PLUMSTEAD) CEMETERY

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Casualty Record Detail
Casualty Record Detail
Casualty Record Detail
Casualty Record Detail
CAPE TOWN (PLUMSTEAD) CEMETERY Print this image


Country:
South Africa
Locality:
Western Cape
Identified Casualties:
241
GPS
CO-Ordinates:
Longitude:
18.4764
Latitude:
-34.02633

Location Information

Plumstead is a suburb of Cape Town 15 kilometres to the south of the city. The cemetery is situated on Victoria Road which leads from the centre of Plumstead to Grassy Park.

From the cemetery entrance follow the road to the Cross of Sacrifice and turn right immediately beyond the Cross. The 1914-1918 Commonwealth war graves plot is on the right with the 1939-1945 plot a little further on the left. The majority of the graves are in these plots with the rest scattered thoughout the cemetery.

Visiting Information

Consult the Secretary, CWGC South African Agency or the Cemetery Office about the position of the scattered graves. There is the potential for attacks in the vicinity of the cemetery. All visitors are strongly advised to take care and not carry valuables or leave them on display in vehicles.

Historical Information

Cape Town and the nearby Simon's Town were the scene of massive shipping movements (including hospital ships) during both World Wars, and there were military hospitals at Maitland and Wynberg. During the Second World War, naval and maritime air operations were conducted from the area. Instruction under the Empire Air Training scheme was conducted at 65 and 66 Air School at Youngsfield Aerodrome in the Wynberg area, and the Fleet Air Arm was established at the Wingfield Aerodrome.

Cape Town (Plumstead) Cemetery contains 145 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 97 from the Second World War. Also in the Commission's care within the cemetery are three war graves of other nationalities, and the graves of three civilian building contractors, buried in a communal grave with service personnel, who were killed in an aircraft crash at Elandsfontein whilst inspecting sites for fortification.