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#LestWeForget

#LestWeForget

25 July 2014

To commemorate the Centenary of the First World War, we're embarking on a social media project to encourage our supporters, visitors and staff to create a photographic record of remembrance.

We'd like to see your photos - of you, your family, friends and colleagues - holding our remembrance message: #LestWeForget. You can take these pictures wherever you like - at home, at work, on holiday, or on a visit to one of our many sites.
 

Why #LestWeForget?

The wording 'Lest We Forget' comes from a poem, 'Recessional', written by Rudyard Kipling, who lost his only son John at Loos in 1915, was a founder member of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and pivotal in creating some of the iconic wording, including 'Known Unto God', that is synonymous with our sites around the world.

Now, at the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of war, the words 'Lest We Forget' have been chosen once again to encompass our feelings of remembrance, and are being engraved on a series of memorial stones being placed at some of our sites across the Western Front by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

What will you be doing with the pictures?

We'll be sharing the images on our social media sites - Facebook and Twitter - and we'd also like to include them in a photo / video montage too.

How can I obtain a sign to hold in my picture?

Click here to download and print the #LestWeForget sheet which we have created. Simply hold it up in your photo - or you can create your own. If you'd like to write your own message of remembrance instead, feel free.

How should I set up my picture?

Make sure the picture is clear, ideally a 'head and shoulders' shot - we've included an example here - and that the wording on the sign can be read easily.

When adding your picture to Twitter make sure you include #LestWeForget.  To add your picture to Facebook please email us.

Keep checking our social media feeds to see what others have uploaded - and to see what our staff in our sites in 153 countries are doing, too.