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Edinburgh schoolboy uses Commission website to discover incredible story

Edinburgh schoolboy uses Commission website to discover incredible story

13/01/2011

12 year old Glynn Mullen, a pupil at Leith Academy in Edinburgh, has devoted several months of his spare time compiling a Roll of Honour of those former pupils who died in the Second World War. Using the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's website, Glynn has drawn up a list of 75 names and by getting in contact with many of the former pupils' families, he has been able to build up a fascinating story of many of those who were killed.

How does the Commission maintain high horticultural standards?

How does the Commission maintain high horticultural standards?

14/12/2010

With thousands of cemeteries and memorials around the world, the Commission deals with a huge variety of horticultural challenges. On-the-job training is a vital part in ensuring our gardeners have all the skills they need to tackle tasks both big and small.

Brave Jervis Bay sailors honoured

Brave Jervis Bay sailors honoured

17/11/2010

5th November 1940 saw a collective act of bravery by those aboard HMS Jervis Bay. Having been assigned to protect a convoy en route from Canada to Liverpool, she took on the much heavier armed German pocket battleship Admiral Scheer in a one-sided contest. But the sacrifice and bravery of those aboard Jervis Bay bought enough time for the convoy to scatter and most ships made it safely into port. At The Historic Dockyard Chatham, in Kent, a special 70th anniversary commemorative service was held to remember those who died.

Irish war dead honoured

Irish war dead honoured

15/11/2010

Following research by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and Glasnevin Trust, which runs Ireland's largest cemetery, 43 Irish men and women who, until now, lay in unmarked graves have had a headstone erected at the spot in which they are buried. On Remembrance Day, relatives of those buried at Glasnevin were amongst the crowd which gathered to see dignatories lay wreaths to remember the fallen.

"Forever India"

28/10/2010

"Forever India" is an educational DVD from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, produced in association with the Indian government. This film recounts the often-overlooked contribution made by hundreds of thousands of Indian men and women during the First World War.

Commission unveils new Indian memorial

Commission unveils new Indian memorial

04/10/2010

On Sunday 26th September 2010, a new memorial, paying tribute to 53 Sikh and Hindu soldiers who died during the First World War, was unveiled. The memorial, built by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, lists the names of those soldiers who were cremated at a funeral pyre site, known as a ghatt, on the hills overlooking Brighton. The new memorial sits alongside the existing Brighton Chattri, which was built after the Great War and which pays tribute to all those Indian soldiers who died fighting for the British Empire.

Fromelles Cemetery opens

Fromelles Cemetery opens

17/08/2010

On 19 July 2010, exactly 94 years after the Battle of Fromelles, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission new Fromelles (Pheasant Wood) Military Cemetery opened. Thousands of people attended this very special event, including hundreds of relatives of those soldiers who died during the battle.

New Fromelles exhibition opens at Imperial War Museum

New Fromelles exhibition opens at Imperial War Museum

05/07/2010

A new exhibition, organised by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, tells the fascinating story of the 250 Australian and British soldiers who were found in several mass graves at Fromelles in northern France in 2008. Over the past two years, the soldiers have been carefully exhumed and reburied in the CWGC's new purpose-built cemetery at Fromelles, the first such cemetery to be built in 50 years.

The untold story of Dunkirk, 1940

The untold story of Dunkirk, 1940

08/06/2010

Operation "Dynamo", as the effort to evacuate thousands of allied servicemen from France became known, was described as a "a miracle of deliverance" by Winston Churchill, but while getting over 330,000 soldiers back home was a huge achievement, it doesn't tell the whole story of June 1940. For many, the fall of France and the retreat to the Channel Ports meant desperate rearguard actions, surrender, captivity and death. Ranald Leask visits some of the Commission's cemeteries and memorials to those who fell at Dunkirk and speaks to the men who were there.

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