Design

The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, assisted by Captain John Reginald Truelove.

 

Truelove, a former captain in the London Regiment, was appointed Assistant Architect to the Commission in 1919. He visited the Chinese section of the British Museum and a Chinese warehouse for inspiration. As a result, the design of the cemetery reflects its national character. The gateway, in the form of a pailou, bears a Chinese inscription to honour the dead and monograms bearing the meaning of eternity.

The inscription was chosen by Shi Zhaoji, who was the Chinese Ambassador to Great Britain during the war. It translates as 'This site commemorates the sacrifice paid by 1,900 Chinese workers who lost their lives during the 1914-1918 war, these are my friends and colleagues whose merits are incomparable'.

Architects and Designers

Sir Edwin Lutyens, Captain John Reginald Truelove

Edwin Lutynes

Sir Edwin Lutyens

The distinguished British architect was born in 1869. He was commissioned by the Imperial War Graves Commission to design many of the cemeteries and memorials of the First World War. Many consider his work for the Commission his greatest. It was Lutyens, along with Sir Reginald Blomfield and Sir Herbert Baker, who first went to visit the temporary burial places in Northern France and Belgium to decide how to proceed with the design of the cemeteries.

John Reginald Truelove

‚ÄčThe British architect was born in 1886. A former captain in the London Regiment, he was appointed Assistant Architect to the Commission in 1919. He designed several cemeteries including Noyelles-sur-mer Chinese Cemetery and Arques-la-Bataille British Cemetery.