Day-by-day

The CWGC commemorates a staggering 120,000 servicemen and women who died between 8 August and 11 November 1918. We are marking the end of the First World War centenary with 120 personal stories of those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the last months of the war. The “Road to Peace” campaign will conclude on 11 November with the stories of 11 people who died on the very last day of the First World War, even as the guns fell silent.

24.9.18 Lieutenant Cecil Coster

Lieutenant Cecil Coster

Lieutenant Cecil Coster of the 17th Squadron, Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry), was killed in action at Samak in Palestine 100 years ago today. He was 26 years old. He is buried in CWGC Haifa War Cemetery, Israel.

Born in 1892, in Bethnal Green, London, Cecil was the son of Vincent and Caroline Coster, of 98 Hastings Road, Maidstone. During his service he was awarded the Military Cross. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘An only son, never forgotten, beloved by all who knew him.’

 

23.9.18 Risaldar Badlu Singh, VC

Risaldar Badlu SinghRisaldar Badlu Singh of the 29th (Deccan Horse) Lancers died 100 years ago today in Palestine. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the CWGC Helopolis (Port Tewfik) Memorial.

Badlu was a Hindu Jat, born on 13 January 1876 in Dhakla, in the Punjab, India. He was first sent to France before being withdrawn with other Indian forces to fight in Palestine. For his actions on the day he died he was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

Click here to discover more about the actions which led to him being awarded the Victoria Cross.

23.9.18 Major Thakur Dalpat Singh

Major Thakur Dalpat Singh

Major Thakur Dalpat Singh of the Jodhpur (Imperial Service) Lancers, was killed in action 100 years ago today in Palestine. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the CWGC Heliopolis (Port Tewfik) Memorial.

Born in November 1892 to a Rajput noble family, he was the son of Thakur Hari Singh, of Deoli, Pali, Jodhpur, Rajputana. Educated at Eastbourne College in England, he joined the British Army in 1913. During the First World War fought on the Western Front until his unit was redeployed to Palestine in 1918. He was awarded the Military Cross in July 1918. He was killed in action during the capture of Haifa.

22.9.18 Captain Keith Brown

Captain Keith BrownCaptain Keith Brown of The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment), died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Five Points Cemetery, Lechelle.

Born in London in 1896, Keith was the son of George Andrews and Alice Alexandra of 18 Croham Park Avenue, Croydon, Surrey. Educated at Dulwich College he was a member of the school Cadet Corps and upon the outbreak of the First World War he volunteered as a Private soldier.

 He served in France and Flanders from November 1914, where he saw much fighting. In May 1915 he returned home and entered Sandhurst, being gazetted as a Second Lieutenant in October. Returned to France, he fought on the Somme in 1916 and was badly wounded during the Battle of High Wood and returned to England to recover. Back in France by January 1917 he was promoted to Lieutenant in July. On 22 September he suffered terrible wounded in action near the French village of Éphey, and died soon after. His commanding officer said that, ‘I was extremely attached to him; indeed he was a general favourite wherever he went.’  Soon after his death it was announced in the London gazette that he had been promoted to Captain. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Love will lead us to our loved again.’

Just fifteen days after Keith was killed, his older brother Captain Clive Andrews Brown of the Royal Engineers died as well.

21.9.18 Lieutenant George Brownrigg-Jay

Lieutenant George Brownrigg-Jay

Lieutenant George Brownrigg-Jay of the 124th Company, Machine Gun Corps, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 24 years old. He is buried in CWGC Villers-Faucon Communal Cemetery Extension.

Born in September 1894 in Ascot, Berkshire, George was the son of Major Harvey Brownrigg-Jay, and Kate Belleville Buselle, of Flaghead, Canford Cliffs, Dorset. He volunteered for overseas service upon the outbreak of the First World War. In 1917, he returned to England and married Gladys Norgrave Douglas at Parish Chapel, St Pancras.

20.9.18 Serjeant Albert Chan

Serjeant Albert ChanSerjeant Albert Chan of the 1st Battalion, British West Indies Regiment, was killed in action by enemy shell fire during the capture of Damiah Bridge in Palestine, 100 years ago today. He was 26 years old. He is buried in CWGC Jerusalem War Cemetery.

Born in British Guiana, Albert was the son of Austin and Sarah Chan who were of Chinese Heritage. During his service he was Mentioned in Dispatches.


19.9.18 Lieutenant Leonard Forbes

Lieutenant Leonard Forbes

Lieutenant Leonard Forbes of the 9th Battalion, the Essex Regiment, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He is buried in CWGC Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery.

Born in 1883, Leonard was the son of John and Rosa Forbes of Dulwich. He volunteered for overseas service with the London Scottish in August 1914, and fought in France from November.  In December 1915, he returned to England and married Beatrice Mary Kingwill. It is believed that Leonard was killed by shell fire while his battalion was in support near the French village of Épehy, they had taken part in the Battle of Épehy the previous day. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Setting duty first he went at once as to a sacrament.’

18.9.18 Major Thomas Breen 

Major Thomas Breen Major Thomas Breen of the 142nd Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He is buried at CWGC Morchies Australian Cemetery.

The son of Inspector General Breen, Thomas was born in 1889 in Dublin. He attended Trinity College, Dublin, where he took his B.A and M.B degrees. He received a commission as a Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps in February 1914.

Upon the outbreak of the First World War he was deployed with the British Expeditionary Force to France and Flanders. Promoted to Captain he took part in the retreat from Mons, and in the operations on the Aisne. He was then promoted to be the Regimental Medical Officer of the 1st Rifle Brigade and was twice appointed Deputy Assistant Director of Medical Services.

In 1918 he was promoted to Major, and in March was attached to the 142nd Field Ambulance which he commanded throughout the desperate days of the German Spring Offensive. He was killed on 18 September, while trying to rescue a wounded German soldier.

An account written after the war states that, ’his coolness and bravery were known to all. It was, in fact, his zeal and unselfish devotion to duty that cost him his life…He was very popular with everyone, and such a splendid soldier, his men would follow him everywhere.’

17.9.1918 Private Reginald Bagnell

Private Reginald Bagnell

Private Reginald Bagnell of the 4th Battalion, Canadian Machine Gun Corps, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 21 years old. He is buried in CWGC Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille.

Born in 1897, Reginald was the son of Mr and Mrs J.M. Bagnell of Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada. He died of a gunshot wound to the arm and right leg in No. 54 General Hospital, Aubengue. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Darling your race is run and victory won, and now your record’s in the sky, Father & Mother.’


16.9.18 Lieutenant Robert Darling

Robert DarlingLieutenant Robert Darling of the 1st/9th Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment), died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 27 years old. He is buried in CWGC Ecoust-St.Mein British Cemetery.

Born in the West Hartlepool village of Hart in 1891, Robert was the son of Robert and Dorothy Darling. During his service he was awarded the Military Cross. Robert and a fellow officer were killed when they were ambushed by an enemy patrol while reconnoitring the front line near the village of Bullecourt. Their bodies were brought back by the men of Robert’s battalion. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘and so shall they ever be with the Lord.’

15.9.18 Gunner Albert Gilmore

Albert GilmoreGunner Albert Gilmore of the 6th Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 34 years old. He is buried in CWGC Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille.

Born in 1884, Albert was the oldest son of Mrs A. H. Gilmore of Toronto, Canada. Before the war he worked as a compositor for the Toronto Star Newspaper and his wife worked as a nurse. Albert volunteered for overseas service in 1915 and trained at the Canadian artillery school in Kingston before leaving for France. Twice wounded during his service, on 9 September 1918 he was caught in a gas attack. Six days later he died in No. 54 General Hospital in Aubengue, France.

14.9.18 Second Lieutenant Vivian Sutton

Vivian SuttonSecond Lieutenant Vivian Sutton of the 2nd/20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich) London Regiment was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front near the French village of Haverincourt. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Ruyaulcourt Military Cemetery.

Born in 1896, Vivian was the son of Charles and Amelia Sutton of Sidcup Kent. He was educated at Rugby School and went on to work as a Chartered Accountant. He volunteered for active service upon the outbreak of the First World War and by 1918 he had served in Ireland, Greece, Egypt, Palestine and France.

Read more about this remarkable young soldier

14.9.18 Private Philip Le Cornu

Philip Le CornuPrivate Philip Le Cornu of the 14th (Royal Montreal) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today. He was 24 Years old. He is buried in St. Mary Churchyard, Jersey.

Born on the Channel Island of Jersey in 1894, Philip was the son of Philip Francis and Mary Le Cornu. Before the war he worked as a clerk. While working in Canada Philip volunteered in September 1916 to serve with Canadian forces. He arrived in France in May 1917 but was badly wounded in the legs in August. He was taken to the 58th Casualty Clearing Station and then evacuated to England for care. He succumbed to his wounds over a year later in the 16th Canadian General Hospital in Orpington, London. His family requested that he be buried at home on Jersey. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’Until the day dawns’.

13.9.18 Private James Crawford

Private James CrawfordPrivate James Crawford of the 19th (Central Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 24 years old. He is buried in CWGC Dominion Cemetery, Hendecourt-Les-Cagnicourt.

Born in Toronto in 1894, James was the son of Hugh and Isabelle Crawford. When he volunteered James wrote to his mother and said, ‘think of what the poor Belgians are suffering. It is right that I should go and help them’. After being at the front for some time one of his last letters home said, ’Do not worry, mother. If you get a telegram compose yourself before you open it, and always hope for the best. Perhaps it will only announce that I am wounded.’

James’ death was a tragic mistake. After being briefly separated from his comrades while on a patrol he was approaching to re-join them and, believing him to be one of the enemy, they shot and killed him. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Ever remembered by his loving mother, sisters & Brother.’

Private George Crawford

12.9.18 Private George Crawford

Private George Crawford of the 28th (Northwest) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago on the Western Front. He was 23 years old. He is buried in CWGC Duisans British Cemetery.

George was on sentry duty on 10 September 1918 when he was badly wounded in the left chest and arms. He was immediately tended to and then evacuated to No.1 Canadian Casualty Clearing Station based at Duisans. Despite the best efforts of the medical staff he succumbed to his wounds two days later.

11.9.18 Private John Beckwith

Private John BeckwithPrivate John Beckwith served with 3rd Canadian Divisional Employment Company of the Canadian Labour Corps on the Western Front. He died 100 years ago today at the 42nd Casualty Clearing Station after being shot in the abdomen. He was 39 years old. He is buried in CWGC Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension in France.

John was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Beckwith of London, England. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘God be with you dear Dad, till we meet again, Grace, Elsie & Edith’.

10.9.18 Private William McMaster

Private William McMasterPrivate William McMaster of the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 21 years old. He is buried in CWGC Terlincthun British Cemetery.

Born in 1897 in Stratford, Ontario, Canada, William was the son of John and Agnes McMaster. Before the War he worked as a clerk. He volunteered for overseas service in November 1915 and arrived on the Western Front in April 1917. In September he was gassed and returned to England for treatment in the Canadian hospital at Shorncliffe. He returned to the Western Front in April 1918 but in August he was gassed again. William was sent to number 7 Stationary Hospital at Boulogne but 15 days later he succumbed to his wounds. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘May his reward be as great as his sacrifice’.

9.9.18 Major Eric Connelly

Major Eric ConnellyMajor Eric Connelly of the 3rd Australian Division Head Quarters died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 29 years old. He is buried in CWGC Heath Cemetery, Harbonnieres.

Born in 1888 in Bendigo, Victoria, Eric was the son of Frances and Thomas Jefferson Connelly. He studied at Carlton College and went on to receive a law degree from Melbourne University. Upon the outbreak of the First World War he volunteered for overseas service and fought on Gallipoli where he was badly wounded and where his brother died. After recovering in Australia he was sent to France and fought during the Battle of Messines in 1917. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for ‘gallant service and devotion to duty’, but was badly gassed. His wounds meant he could no longer serve on the front line and so he was appointed to the General Staff. On the night of 8 September 1918 he was wounded during a German air raid and died the following day. His wife was on route to see him, arriving from Australian only to discover he had been killed. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘to conquer is to live enough’.

8.9.18 Private Delbert Greenwood

Private Delbert Greenwood

Private Delbert Greenwood of the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 20 years old. He has no known grave and is commemorated by the CWGC on the Vimy Memorial in France.

Born in 1898 in Cedarbrae, Ontario, Canada, Delbert was the son of Francis Xavier and Martha Greenwood, of Virginia, Ontario. Before the war he was a farmer. He had been in France 10 months when he was killed in action.

7.9.18 Private Charles Short

Private Charles Short

Private Charles Short of the 3rd (Toronto) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died of wounds 100 years ago today. He was 23 years old. He is buried in Twyford (St. Mary) Churchyard, UK.

Born in Bristol in 1894, Charles and his family immigrated to Canada in 1902 and lived in Hamilton. Charles volunteered for active service in 1916 with the Canadian Army. While in England he married Annie Short of number 97 Queen’s Road, Reading before traveling to France. After a year in France he was badly wounded in action during the Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line in early September 1918, suffering paralysis from a gunshot wound. He was evacuated to England but died five days later in No.4 London General Hospital, Demark Hill. Annie requested that he be buried close to her, and so he was laid to rest in Berkshire. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words,’We miss him most who loved him best’.

7.9.18 Second Lieutenant William Smith

Second Lieutenant William SmithSecond Lieutenant William Smith of the Royal Air Force, died 100 years ago today in Egypt. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Cairo War Memorial Cemetery.

Born in Montreal, Canada, in 1896 William was the son of William Henry and Clara Smith. Before the War he worked for the Grand Trunk Railway. He volunteered for oversea service in 1915 with the Canadian Army Medical Corps. He found himself working in the safety of a hospital in the UK but he wanted to see action so volunteered for the dangerous job of flying.

Click here to discover the story of this remarkable 22 year old pilot

6.9.18 Private Samuel Wilkinson

Private Samuel WilkinsonPrivate Samuel Wilkinson of the 1st/7th Durham Light Infantry, died 100 years ago today in German as a prisoner of war. He was 22 years old. He is buried in Berlin South-Western Cemetery, Germany.
 
Born in Leeds, Samuel was the son of Charles and Ada Wilkinson of number 19 Radcliffe Lane, Pudsey, Leeds. Before the war he worked as a grocer. He attested for service in December 1915, and was mobilised for active service in April 1916. On 26 March 1918, during the German Spring Offensive, he was shot in the spine and taken prisoner. He was cared for in a Red Cross Hospital in Maubeuge, Germany, until he finally succumbed to his wounds. He was buried in a nearby cemetery until 1924-25, when all British graves in Germany were concentrated into four cemeteries to ensure their continuing care. Upon his headstone is inscribed the Hebrew word, ‘Mizpah’, meaning watchtower.

5.9.18 Captain Richard Knight

Captain Richard KnightCaptain Richard Knight of the 4th Battalion of the Bedfordshire Regiment, died of wounds in hospital 100 years ago today. He was 37 years old. He is buried in CWGC St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.

Born in Chawton, Hampshire in 1881, Richard was the son of the Reverend Charles Knight, Rector of Chawton, and Emma Knight, of "Summerlands," South Farnborough, Hampshire. He studied at Oxford University before the War. It is believed that Richard was wounded during the Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line on 2-3 September 1918, and then transferred to the base hospitals at Rouen for recovery, later succumbing to his wounds.  The inscription upon his headstone reads, ’Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God’.

4.9.18 Trooper Christopher Allmond

Trooper Christopher Allmond

Trooper Christopher Allmond of the 9th Australian Light Horse, died of malaria in Egypt 100 years ago. He was 25 years old. He is buried in CWGC Port Said War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

Born in Cherryville, South Australia, Christopher was the son of Ann Elizabeth Allmond, and before the First World War he worked as a gardener. He volunteered for overseas service in January 1916, and served in Africa and the Middle East from September 1916 with the Australian battalion of the Imperial Camel Corps. Having fought through many battles, in May 1918 Christopher was admitted to hospital with malaria. In late August he was transferred to the Australian General Hospital in Port Said but he died four days later. He was buried by Chaplain Stanley Wain on 5 September 1918.

3.9.18 Lieutenant Walter Ward

Lieutenant Walter Ward

Lieutenant Walter Ward of the 171st Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Asiago Plateau in Italy. He was 20 years old. Walter is buried at CWGC Barenthal Military Cemetery, northern Italy.

Born in Camberwell, London, in 1898, Walter was the youngest son of Anthony Arthur, a General Practitioner in Camberwell, and Annie Amelia Ward, of number 12, Asylum Road, London. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Faithful unto death’.

2.9.18 Captain Geoffrey Bowen

Geoffrey BowenCaptain Geoffrey Bowen of the 2nd Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action during the Battle for the Drocourt-Queant line in France 100 years ago today. He was 23 years old. He is buried in CWGC Windmill British Cemetery, Monchy-Le-Preux, France.

Born in 1895 in Brentford, London, Geoffrey was the son of Winifred Mary Bowen. The family lived in Burley, near Brockenhurst, in the New Forest. Geffrey volunteered for active service in 1915, and fought in almost every major British battle on the Western Front, including the Battle of the Somme in 1916 where he was wounded.

Click here to discover the story of this remarkable 23 year old veteran soldier.

1.9.18 Major Geoffrey Bellamy

Geoffrey Bellamy Major Geoffrey Bellamy of the 4th Battalion of the Machine Gun Corps, died of wounds on the Western Front 100 years ago today during the Second Battle of Arras, 1918. He was 24 years old. He is buried in CWGC Ligny-St. Flochel British Cemetery, Averdoint, France.

Born in 1894, Geoffrey was the son of George and Florence Bellamy, of number 11 Hartley Avenue, Plymouth, and was a graduate of Exeter College, Oxford.

Geoffrey had been wounded before at the Battle of Messines in June 1917 but had quickly returned to the front in August. In late August 1918 he was wounded and brought to a Casualty Clearing Station based in the French village of Ligny-St. Flochel where he died. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘He died the noblest death a man may die’.

31.8.18 Serjeant Leigh Smith

Sergeant Leigh Smith

Serjeant Leigh Smith of the 72nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front at Bankswood near St. Ledger. He was 28 years old. He is buried in CWGC Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery.

Born is South Shields, Leigh was the son of John and Margaret Harper Smith of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He had been a soldier before the outbreak of war, serving with Northumberland Fusiliers from February 1911. During the First World War he served in France from April 1915, and was later transferred to the Royal Field Artillery. Leigh fought in Italy from November 1917, returning to France the following March. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Blessed are the pure in heart’.

Peter Layard

30.8.18 Lieutenant Burnett Grosvenor

Lieutenant Burnett Grosvenor of the 3rd (Toronto) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of the Scarpe. He was 26 years old. He is buried in CWGC Valley Cemetery, Vis-en-Artois, France, with 26 other members of his battalion who were also killed in action 100 years ago today.

Burnett was the son of Mary and John Grosvenor of 33 Reedswood Road, Birchills, Walsall, England. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘He was a good son and devoted to his mother’.

Private Edward Tate

29.8.18 Private Edward Tate

Private Edward Tate of the 6th Battalion, the Northamptonshire Regiment, died of wounds 100 years ago today at the 41st Clearing Station, near Albert, on the Western Front. He was 19 years old. Edward is buried in CWGC Daours Communal Cemetery Extension.

Edward was the son of Richard and Emma Tate, of 67 Alsen Road, Holloway, London. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’One of the best’.

28.8.18 Major George Musgrove

Major George MusgroveMajor George Musgrove of the 20th (Central Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of the Scarpe. He was 36 years old. He is buried in CWGC Vis-En-Artois British Cemetery, France.

Born in Walsall, England, George was the son of William and Caroline Musgrove, and the husband of Eva Musgrove of Hanover, Ontario, Canada. Before 1914 he had worked as a Metallurgical Chemist, and had served in the forces during the Boer War. During the First World War he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Order and was Mentioned in Despatches.

27.8.18 Second Lieutenant Gerard Brassey

BrasseySecond Lieutenant Gerard Brassey of the 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 19 years old. He is buried in CWGC’s Mory Street Military Cemetery, St. Leger, France.

Educated at Eton, Gerard was the son of Sir Leonard Brassey, Member of Parliament for Northamptonshire North, and Lady Violet Brassey, of Apethorpe Hall, Peterborough.

26.8.18 Serjeant Joseph Harvey

Harvey

Serjeant Joseph Harvey of the 2nd/4th King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of the Scarpe. He was 29 years old. He is buried in CWGC H.A.C. Cemetery, Ecoust-St. Mein, France.

Joseph was the son of Charles and Louisa Harvey, of Great Barr, Birmingham, and husband of Mabel Harvey, of Moddershall, Stone, Staffordshire. Joseph had volunteered for overseas service upon the outbreak of war in 1914. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘He fought and died for England and the honour of his race’.

25.8.18 Private Charles Robert Mays 

Mays

Private Charles Robert Mays of the 21st Squadron, Machine Gun Corps, Middlesex Yeomanry (Cavalry), died 100 years ago today in Palestine. He was 27 years old. He is buried in CWGC Jerusalem War Cemetery.

Charles was the son of William and Helen Mays, of 13 Brimmington Road, Peckham, London. Charles enlisted in Chelsea in 1915, and fought in Egypt and Palestine for 3 years before his death. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’Thy will be done’.

24.8.18 Lieutenant Gilbert Adamson

Lieutenant Gilbert Adamson

Lieutenant Gilbert Adamson of the 1st/7th Battalion, the Middlesex Regiment, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 23 years old. He is buried in CWGC Bellacourt Military Cemetery, France.

Educated at the City of London School and Merton College, Oxford, Gilbert was the son of Professor John William of Kings College London and Amanda Adamson, of 44 Whitehall Park, Highgate, London. Two months before he was killed Gilbert was awarded the Military Cross for, ‘gallantry in the field’. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’Killed in action Croisilles, Quit you like men in your hands Lord’.

23.8.18 Lieutenant Thomas Brown

Lieutenant Thomas BrownLieutenant Thomas Brown of the 15th Battalion, 3rd New Zealand Rifle Brigade died on the Western Front 100 years ago today during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 36 years old. He is buried in CWGC Queens Cemetery, Bucquoy, France.

Born at Green Island, New Zealand, Thomas was the son of John and Lucy Brown, of 109, Don Steet., Invercargill, New Zealand. During his war service he was awarded the Military Cross.

23.8.18 Lieutenant Peter Layard

Lieutenant Peter Layard

Lieutenant Peter Layard of the 4th Battalion, the Suffolk Regiment, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western front while attempting to help a wounded German soldier. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Douchy-Les-Ayette British Cemetery, France.

Born in Malvern, Worcester, Peter was the son of George and Eleanor Layard. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’Son of George Somes Layard, enamoured of life he went laughing into the arms of death’.

Click here to discover his story

22.8.18 Major Bertie Tower

Major Bertie Tower

Major Bertie Tower, commanding officer of the 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, was killed by enemy shell fire 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 30 years old. He is buried in CWGC Bellacourt Military Cemetery, France.

Bertie completed his officer training at Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in 1906. He became captain in 1915, and during his service he was awarded the Military Cross twice, and was Mentioned in Despatches three times.

Born at Chilton Lodge, Berkshire, Bertie was the son of Commander F. F. Tower of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and Laura Tower, of 66 Prince's Gate, South Kensington, London. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘His memory hallowed in the land he loved’.

21.8.18 Lieutenant Frank Hicks

Lieutenant Frank Hicks

Lieutenant Frank Hicks of the 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 21 years old. Frank is buried in CWGC Bucquoy Road Cemetery, France.

He was the son of Alan and Alice Hicks, of The Stone House, Bolney, Sussex. During his service Frank was awarded the Military Cross. The inscription upon his headstone reads, ‘Memoria in Aeterna’, meaning, ‘in eternal remembrance’.

20.8.18 Private Alfred Riches

Private Alfred Riches

Private Alfred Riches of the 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 39 years old. Alfred is buried in CWGC Fouquescourt British Cemetery, France.

Alfred was the son of Alfred and Hannah Riches, of King's Lynn, Norfolk, England, and was the husband of Kate Riches, of 11 Mintern Avenue, Brantford, Ontario, Canada. Before the war Alfred worked for Massy Harris, the tractor manufacture, and his name appears on the company war memorial outside of their former head office at King Street West, Toronto. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘His loss we do mourn, yet we know he’s above, waiting for those whom on earth he did love’.

19.8.18 Private Jesse Barmby

Jesse BarmbyPrivate Jesse Barmby of the 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, was killed 100 years ago today by enemy shell fire near the French village of Hattencourt, on the Western Front. He was 33 years old. He is buried in CWGC Warvillers Churchyard Extension.

Born in Yorkshire, Robert was the youngest of four sons of Thomas Barmby, of Thwing, near Filey in Yorkshire. Before the war Robert traveled to Canada and lived in the Lang district of southern Saskatchewan, working as a labour. Jesse suffered from asthma and when he was drafted in 1918, he didn't think he would pass the medical exam, however he was accepted. He was killed in action less than a month after arriving in France. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘ASLEEP IN JESUS’.

18.8.18 Private Henry NorwestHenry Norbet

Private Henry Norwest of the 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, was killed by a sniper on the Western Front 100 years ago today. He was 30 years old. He is buried in Warvillers Churchyard Extension, France.

Born in Fort Saskatchewan, in Alberta, Canada, Henry was the son of Genevieve Norwest of Sacred Heart, Alberta. During his service he became a decorated sniper and was credited with 115 kills.

Click here to discover his story.

18.8.18 Private Robert Moyes

Private Robert Moyes

Private Robert Moyes of the 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, was killed in action 100 years ago today. He was 19 years old. He is buried in CWGC Fouquescourt British Cemetery, France.

Robert was the son of Mrs. E. Moyes of Calgary, Alberta. In 1924, she paid for a short piece in the Calgary Herald in memory of Robert. It said, “’A silent thought a secret tear, keeps his memory ever dear,’ Inserted by his loving Mother and Jack and Jim”

17.8.18 Captain Charles Pavitt

Captain Charles Pavitt

Captain Charles Pavitt of the 18th Divisional Train, Army Service Corps, died 100 years ago today. He was 35 years old. Charles died in hospital after battling influenza for three months. He is buried at Putney Vale Cemetery and Crematorium, London.

Charles was the son of Joseph and Annie Pavitt, of Wimbledon Common, London, and the husband of Josephine Pavitt. He had worked in the London Stock Exchange before volunteering for military service. He served on the Western Front from July 1915, and during his service was awarded the Military Cross.

16.8.18 Lance Corporal Joseph Bloxham

Lance Corporal Joseph Bloxham

Lance Corporal Joseph Bloxham of the 19th (Central Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 23 years old. He has no known grave and is commemorated by the CWGC on the Vimy Memorial.

Joseph was the son of Leonard and Mary Summers Bloxham, of Allandale, Ontario. Joseph’s older brother, Sapper William Bloxham, died on the 1 February 1919, while serving with the Canadian Railway Corps. There is a street named after the brothers in Barrie, Canada.

15.8.18 Captain David McAndie

Captain David McAndie

Captain David McAndie of the 10th (Canadians) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 31 years old. David is buried in CWGC Cerisy-Gailly Military Cemetery, France.

Born in Portmahomack, Scotland, David was the son of James and Helen McAndie. He served in the ranks where he won the Military Medal and the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He then received a battlefield commission and was made an officer. He went on to win the Military Cross and was Mentioned in Dispatches. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words chosen by his Mum and Dad, ‘Ever fondly remembered’.

14.8.18 Major Leonard Drummond-Hay

Major Leonard Drummond-HayMajor Leonard Drummond-Hay of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 23 years old. Leonard is buried at CWGC Bouchoir New British Cemetery.

Born in Vancouver, Leonard was the son Edward Drummond-Hay, of Kitscoty, Alberta, Canada. He had won the Military Cross during the Battle of the Somme in 1916, and had achieved the rank of Major by the age of just 22. Had he lived, he would have become Earl of Kinnoull, Perthshire, Scotland. Leonard’s younger brother, Lieutenant Eric Drummond-Hay, was killed in action on 2 September 1918.

13.8.18 Sergeant Robert Spall, VCSergeant Robert Spall

Sergeant Robert Spall of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment), was killed in action at Parvillers-le-Quesnoy, France, 100 years ago today. He was 28 years old. Born in Ealing, Middlesex, England, Robert was the son of Charles and Annies Maria Spall. He has no known grave and is commemorated by the CWGC on the Vimy Memorial.

For his actions on the day he died, Robert was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

Click here to read an account from the London Gazette on his CWGC page

Private Sydney Ness12.8.18 Private Sidney Ness

Private Sidney Ness of the 50th Battalion, Australian Infantry, died 100 years ago today during the Battle of Amiens. He was 31 years old. Sidney is buried in CWGC Bronfay Farm Military Cemetery, France.

Sidney was the son of Hugh and Susan Ness of Warrow, South Australia. Sidney’s headstone inscription reads, ‘In fond memory of one dearly loved, son of Mr. & Mrs. Ness of Warrow’.

12.8.18 Captain Eric McNair, VC

Eric McNairCaptain Eric McNair of the 9th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment died 100 years ago today in Italy. He was 24 years old. Eric is buried in CWGC Staglieno Cemetery, Genoa.

Born in India, Eric was the son of George Burgh McNair and Isabella Frederica McNair, of Harrington Street, Calcutta. During the First World War he was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Ypres in 1915, was wounded during the Battle of the Somme in 1916, and then insisted that he return to the front. Still ill from his wounds, he died soon after arriving in Italy to take up a staff posting.

Click here to discover his story
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11.8.18 Corporal Edward ChaseCorporal Edward Chase

Corporal Edward Chase served with the Royal Engineers, attached to the 21st Brigade of the Royal Garrison Artillery, Signal Section. He died 100 years ago today during the Battle of Amiens. He was 27 years old. He is buried in CWGC Heath Cemetery, Harbonnieres.

Edward was the son of Edward and Amelia Chase of Sussex. His headstone inscription reads, ‘For ever with the Lord’.

 

10.8.18 Major Thomas RingwoodMajor Thomas Ringwood

Major Thomas Ringwood died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of Amiens. He was 31 years old. He commanded the Royal School of Artillery at Kingston, Quebec City, Canada, before serving in France with the 14th Brigade of the Canadian Field Artillery. Thomas is buried in CWGC Cerisy-Gailly Military Cemetery.

He was the son of Cora Castle of British Columbia, and John Ringwood of Ireland. The inscription on Thomas’s headstone, “VINCIT QUI PATITUR”, is Latin for “Who Endures Conquers”.

Private Guthrie Andrew

9.8.18 Private Guthrie Andrew

Private Guthrie Andrew fought with the 58th Battalion of the Australian Imperial Force on the Western Front. Guthrie died 100 years ago today during the Battle of Amiens. He was 30 years old. He is buried in Heath Cemetery, Harbonnieres.
He was the son of William Smith Andrew and Mary Andrew. His headstone states the place of his birth…“BORN AT MONKTON, AYRSHIRE, SCOTLAND 30. IV. 1888”

Lieutenant Reginald Hingston

8.8.18 Lieutenant Reginald Hingston

Lieutenant Reginald Hingston of the 24th Battalion (Victoria Rifles) Canadian Infantry, was killed in action 100 years ago today during the Battle of Amiens. He was 33 years old. He is buried in CWGC Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery.

Reginald’s son Basil was three when his father died. Basil served during the Second World War and was killed in action in September 1944 during Operation Market Garden. Basil is buried in CWGC Arnhem Oosterbeek War Cemetery