The 11 on the 11th

11 on the 11th

NB. Since this graphic was made it has been brought to our attention that a photograph we used purporting to be Private George Ellison was erroneously attributed, and was not an image of George. More here.

11 on the 11th

Day-by-day

The CWGC commemorates a staggering 120,000 servicemen and women who died between 8 August and 11 November 1918. We are marking the end of the First World War centenary with 120 personal stories of those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the last months of the war. The “Road to Peace” campaign will conclude on 11 November with the stories of 11 people who died on the very last day of the First World War, even as the guns fell silent.

10.11.18 Lance Corporal Charles Handcock

Lance Corporal Charles HandcockLance Corporal Charles Handcock of the 38th Battalion, Australian Infantry, Australian Imperial Force, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 32 years old. Charles is buried in CWGC Abbeville Communal Cemetery.

Born in 1886 in Echuca, Victoria, Australia to Charles (sr) and Harriet Handcock, Charles (jr) was the eldest of nine sons and a daughter. After attending the local state school he worked on the family farm. In 1912, Charles married Lilian Cox, and the couple had three children together; Norman, Elsie, and George.

When war came, eight of the Handcock brothers enlisted in the forces. Charles enlisted in February 1916, and after a period of training in Australia, he left for England with the 37th Battalion and arrived in France in November 1916. Charles was wounded in August 1918, and then again in September 1918, and after nearly two years of heavy fighting, high casualties and few reinforcements, his battalion was disband and Charles was transferred to the 38th Battalion.

At the end of October Charles reported sick and was evacuated to the 3rd Australian Hospital in Abbeville, on the French coast. Here he died less than two weeks later on 10 November of bronchopneumonia.

Charles’ younger brother Private John Albert Hancock was killed on 25 April 1915, during the landings at Anzac Cove on Gallipoli. He is commemorated by name on CWGC Lone Pine Memorial. Three more Handcock brothers were seriously wounded during the war.

 

 

9.11.18 Captain Eric Lindsay Bury MC

Captain Eric Lindsay Bury MCCaptain Eric Bury of the 3rd Light Company Royal Engineers, died 100 years ago today in Bristol. He was 27 years old. Eric is buried in Bristol (Canford) Cemetery, England.

Born in 1892 in Florida, USA, Eric was the son of Lindsay Bury a British citizen and Georgia Davis, an American. Lindsay Bury was an ex-amateur footballer who helped the Old Etonians win the FA Cup in 1879 and twice played for England. He then went into business and owned an orange plantation in Florida. Eric had an older sister Janet, and in 1897 when Eric was five the family moved to England. Eric attended Warren Hill School, Eastbourne and Trinity College Cambridge.

Eric joined the Royal Engineers of the Territorial Army before the war. Following the outbreak of War he was dispatched to France in August 1914, serving as a corporal with the 3rd Signals Company, Royal Engineers. In 1915, Eric’s father Lindsay went out to France to serve as a driver with the French Red Cross.

At the beginning of 1916, Eric married Dolores Gratney Annie Thornton in London, and couple had a son together, Robin Cyril Lindsay Bury, born in 1918.

In February 1916, Eric was made a temporary Second Lieutenant. He was awarded the Military Cross which was gazetted in January 1917, and in February 1917 he was made a temporary Captain. In late 1918, Eric became ill and was evacuated back to England. He was transferred to the 2nd Southern General Hospital in Southmead, Bristol, where he died.

Eric’s son, Robin Cyril Lindsay Bury served during the Second World War with the Special Boat Service, S.A.S. Regiment, A.A.C. attached to No 9 Commando and died in Greece in September 1944 and is buried in CWGC Phaleron War Cemetery.

8.11.18 Private George Jaffray Margerison

Private George Jaffray MargerisonPrivate George Margerison of the 18th (Liverpool Hussars) Battalion, The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), died 100 years ago today. He was 19 years old. He is buried in CWGC Dourlers Communal Cemetery Extension.

George was born in 1898 in Walton-le-Dale, Preston, the son of Caleb McKune and Fanny Mary Margerison. George was born a twin with his brother Louis, and their father Caleb Margerison owned a soap manufacturing business. The family moved to the Isle of Wight, were the twins were educated at King Williams College.

George was offered a place a Keble College, Oxford, but along with his brother was conscripted into army in 1917. Louis proved physical unfit for service and was discharged in February 1918, but George made it through initial training and was posted to France. He joined the 14th Battalion, The Kings (Liverpool Regiment), which was heavy involved in the German Spring Offensive and in August 1918, following casualties and a shortage of reinforcements what remained of his battalion was absorbed by the 18th Battalion.

On 8 November, the 18/Kings went into action near the village of Avesnes-sur-Helpe, the village was captured but 55 officers and men of the battalion were wound or killed in the attack. 13 of the battalions dead were buried sided by side in Dourlers Communal Cemetery Extension including George.

George’s sister, Frances Mary Margerison was killed during an air raid on London in April 1941. Her name is recorded on the CWGC Civilian Roll of Honour, held at Westminster Abbey.

7.11.18 Captain Clive Andrews Brown

Captain Clive Andrews BrownCaptain Clive Andrews Brown of the Royal Engineers, adjutant commanding Royal Engineers, Canterbury, died 100 years ago today. He was 28 years old. Clive is buried in Wallington (Brandon Hill) Cemetery, England.

Clive was born on 26 June 1890, in Glasgow, Scotland, to George and Alice Brown. The family moved to London and Clive was educated at Dulwich College, and University College, London, where he was a member of the Officers' Training Corps. He joined the Territorial Army in September 1912 and was called up for service upon the outbreak of the First World War.

Clive received a commission and was gazetted as a Second Lieutenant with Royal Engineers in September 1915. Clive was deemed not physically fit for overseas service but continued to serve his country, performing a number of administrative and logistical roles in England. On the 17 April 1915 Clive married Winifred Edith Cowan, and the couple had a daughter together, Maureen, born in 1917.

In September 1918 Clive’s brother, Captain Keith Brown, was killed in France. A little over a month later, Clive contracted influenza, and died at the Military Hospital at Shorncliffe.

6.11.18 Lieutenant Alan McLeod VC

Lieutenant Alan McLeod VCLieutenant Alan McLeod of the Royal Air Force, died 100 years ago today from Spanish flu while recuperating from wounds received in action. He was 19 years old. Alan is buried in Winnipeg (Old Kildonan) Presbyterian Cemetery, Manitoba, Canada.

Alan was born on 20 April 1899, in Stonewall, Manitoba, Canada. He was a member of the Canadian Militia before the war but was too young for overseas service when war broke out. Despite repeated attempts to enlist it was only once he turned 18 in 1917 that he was able to join the Royal Flying Corps.

After training Allan was shipped out to France and flew his first operation in December 1917. On 27 March 1918 he performed an act of extreme skill and gallantry while in action against a German fighter aircraft. For his action he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

Allen had been badly wounded during the fight on 27 March 1918 and was sent back to Canada to recover. While recuperating he contracted Spanish Flu and died. He was laid to rest in the family plot and today lies alongside his mother, Margaret Annett McLeod, and father, Dr. Alexander Neil McLeod.

On the 9 May 2017, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stone and descriptive bronze plaque were placed next to the McLeod family plot.

5.11.18 Captain John Dow Captain John Dow  

Captain John Dow of the Indian Medical Service died 100 years ago today in Shiraz, Iran. He was 29 years old. He is buried in CWGC Tehran War Cemetery, Iran.

Born in June 1889, in Dallas Schoolhouse, Elgin, Morayshire, Scotland, John was the first son of Peter, the local schoolmaster, and Marjoie. John excelled at school and went on to study medicine, achieving his M.A M.B, Bachelor of Surgery in 1914. John worked at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary before joining the army. 

He was posted as a Medical Officer to the 1st Duke of York's Lancers (Skinner's Horse) of the Indian Army, later transferring to the Indian Medical Department. 

John’s younger brother, Captain David Edward Dow of the 1st/6th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders died of wounds, received at the Battle of Arras, on 17 May 1917.

4.11.18 Lieutenant Colonel James Marshall VC Lieutenant Colonel James Marshall VC

Lieutenant Colonel James Marshall of the Irish Guards attached to the 16th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, died 100 year ago today on the Western Front. He was 31 years old. He is buried in Ors Communal Cemetery, France. 
Born in Manchester in 1887, James grew up in Birmingham and attended Birmingham University where he studied Veterinary Medicine. Upon the outbreak of the First World War he was working in Argentina but he returned to the UK and enlisted in the forces. 

On 4 November 1918, James led his battalion during an attack on the Sambre-Oise Canal. When a bridge vital for the success of the operation was damaged, James went forward and organised a repair. Under intense fire and with complete disregard for his own safety, he stood on the bank, encouraging his men and assisting in the work. When the bridge was repaired he attempted to rush across but was instantly killed. 

For his actions James was awarded the Victoria Cross. He was the husband of Edith Marshall, of Lascelles Lodge, Matching Green, Harlow, Essex. Upon James’s headstone are inscribed the words chosen by Edith, ‘Splendid is death, when thou fallest courageous leading the on slaught’.

It was during this same battle that the war poet Lieutenant Wilfred Owen was killed. Wilfred is also buried in Ors Communal cemetery. 

 

3.11.18 Nurse Bertha Bartlett Nurse Bertha Bartlett

Nurse Bertha Bartlett of the Canadian Voluntary Aid Detachment of the British Red Cross died 100 years ago today  in the United Kingdom. She was 23 years old. Bertha is buried in Wandsworth (Earlsfield) Cemetery, London.
Born in Brigus, Conception Bay, Newfoundland, on 14 November 1894, Bertha was the daughter of Mary and Robert Bartlett. She volunteered as a nurse during the war and worked in the UK during the Spanish Flu pandemic, treating the sick until she too fell ill and died. 

 

 

3.11.18 Able Seaman Albert Mckenzie Able Seaman Albert Mckenzie

Able Seaman Albert Mckenzie served with the Royal Navy, aboard HMS Vindictive. He died 100 year ago today. He was 20 years old. He is buried in CWGC Camberwell Old Cemetery, London.

Born in Bermondsey, he was the son of Alexander and Eliza Mckenzie of Shorncliffe Road, London. In 1918 he took part in the Zeebrugge Raid, and for his actions on the night of 23 April he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

An extract from "The London Gazette,", dated 19th July, 1918, records the following: "On the night of the operation he landed on the mole with his machine-gun in the face of great difficulties, and did very good work, using his gun to the utmost advantage. He advanced down the mole with Lieut. Comdr. Harrison, who with most of his party was killed, and accounted for several of the enemy running from a shelter to a destroyer alongside the mole. This very gallant seaman was severely wounded whilst working his gun in an exposed position."

Recovered from most of his wounds, King George V presented him with the Victoria Cross at Buckingham Palace in the summer of 1918. In October he contracted Spanish Flu and died eight days before the 11 November Armistice. 

 

 

2.11.18 Private Joseph Cooke Private Joseph Cooke

Private Joseph Cooke of the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry), died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 20 years old. Joseph is buried in Lamain Communal Cemetery, Belgium. 

Born on Malta in October 1898, Joseph was the only son of Joseph and Annie Elizabeth Cooke. Joseph senior was a Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant in the Durham Light Infantry, while his Annie worked in the Middlesex branch of the Volunteer Aid Detachment. 

Joseph junior joined the 19th Battalion of the London Regiment in September 1916, but was later transferred to the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). He left for Egypt in autumn 1917, where he took part in operations in Palestine. His unit was transferred to France in April 1918. Six months later Joseph was killed in action half a mile west of Morquoin Windwill. His Captain wrote that he was a “cheerful and willing soldier, and his equal hard to find”.

Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘In Loving Memory, An Only Son, Jerusalem, Jordan, Lys, Somme, Flanders”

 

 

1.11.18 Captain William McClure Calder Captain William McClure Calder

Captain William McClure Calder of the Canadian Forestry Corps, died 100 years ago today in France. He was 24 years old. William is buried at CWGC Champagnole Communal Cemetery, which is located near the Swiss border. 

William was a student before the war at McGill University in Montreal. In April 1915 he enlisted as a private soldier with Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, but in September he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. William arrived in France in late 1916, and in January 1917 was transferred to the Canadian Forestry Corps. The Corps worked to produce the vast quantities of essential timber required by the army in the field. 

William was killed in a traffic accident when the motorcycle he was riding collided with an oncoming lorry.

 

 

31.10.18 Trooper Allen Jenkins Trooper Allen Jenkins

Trooper Allen Jenkins of the Canadian Light Horse died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 21 years old. Allen is buried in CWGC Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension, France. 

Born in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, Allen was the son of Walter and Sarah Jenkins and before the outbreak of the First World War he worked as a mason. He volunteered for overseas service with Canadian Forces in November 1915, sailing for France in October aboard S.S. Grampian. He was gassed and spent a period in the UK recovering before returning to the Western Front. In October 1918, he was admitted to the 1st South African General Hospital in Abbeville, suffering from Spanish Flu. In his Will he left everything to his mother. 

 

 

30.10.18 Matron Jean Walker Matron Jean Walker

Matron Jean Walker of the Australian Army Nursing Service, died 100 years ago today in the UK. She was 39 years old. Jean is buried in Sutton Veny (St. John) Churchyard, Wiltshire.

Born in 1879, in Port Sorrell, Tasmania, Australia, Jean was the daughter of Alfred and Louisa Miles Walker, of "Allowah," Dunbarra Road, Bellevue Hill, Sydney. 

Jean trained as a nurse at Hobart General Hospital and after graduation in 1906 she joined the Australian Army Nursing Service. Upon the outbreak of the First World War she was one of 25 nurses that accompanied the Australian Expeditionary Force to Egypt, and she worked as acting Matron at the Mena House Hospital in Cairo. In October 1916 she was transferred to England and promoted to Matron of the Australian Auxiliary Hospital in Duxford. 

In early 1917 she was awarded the Royal Red Cross medal First Class for, Exceptional services in military nursing, and was then posted to France where she was Matron of the British Stationary Hospital at Abbeville.

In October 1918 she returned to England to work at the Military Hospital in Sutton Veny but here she caught Spanish flu and died. She was given a burial with full military honours.

 

 

29.10.18 Major Charles BalcombeMajor Charles Balcombe

Major Charles Balcombe of the 11th Field Company of the Royal Engineers, died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 30 years old. Charles is buried in CWGC Awoingt British Cemetery

Born in 1888, Charles was the son of Stephen B. Balcombe, and the husband of A. D. Balcombe, of The Grey House, Camborne, Cornwall. He was educated at Felsted School in Essex and then attended the Camborne School of Mines. Charles arrived on the Western Front in May 1915 and during the War was awarded the Military Cross twice. He died at the 45th Casualty Clearing Station which was based at Awoingt from October to December 1918. 

28.10.18 Private Robert InglisPrivate Robert Inglis

Private Robert Inglis of the 19th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, died 100 years ago today in Germany as a prisoner of war. He was 19 years old. Robert is buried in CWGC Niederzwehren Cemetery, Kassel.

Born in 1899, Robert was the son of Alexander and Margaret Bowman Inglis, of 11, Earlspark Avenue, Newlands, Glasgow. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘All our beauty and hope and joy we owe to lads like you.’

 

27.10.18 Leading Telegraphist William Smith Leading Telegraphist William Smith

Leading Telegraphist William Smith of HMS Gabriel, Royal Navy, died 100 years ago today. He was 19 years old. William died in the UK and is buried in Fulham Palace Road Cemetery

Born in 1899, William was the son of Mrs Harriet Hindley (formerly Smith), of 18, Tynemouth Street. Fulham. Upon his head stone are inscribed the words, ‘A place is vacant in our home that never can be filled.

27.10.18 Second Lieutenant John “Jack” Youll, VCSecond Lieutenant John “Jack” Youll, VC

Second Lieutenant John Youll of the 11th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers, was killed in action 100 years ago today in Italy. He was 21 years old. John is buried in CWGC Giavera British Cemetery, Arcade, Italy.

Born in 1897, John Youll was the youngest son of Richard and Margaret of Thornley, County Durham. Before the war he worked at the local colliery as an apprentice electrician.
John served on the Western Front in France and in Italy, where he was awarded the Victoria Cross in June 1918.
John was killed in action during the final Allied advance in Italy. Just a week later, Austro-Hungarian forces surrendered. 

27.10.18 Captain Edmund Baskett Captain Edmund Baskett

Captain Edmund Baskett of the 9th Battalion, Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, attached to the Nigeria Regiment, died 100 years ago today in Nigeria. He was 35 years old. Edmund is buried in Lokoja Town Cemetery

Born in 1883, Edmund was the son of the Nathaniel and Agnes Baskett, of Cambridge, New Zealand, and was the husband of Dorothy Mary Baskett, of "Stapleton," Bury Road., Newmarket, England. 

 

 

Major Atwood Mackay of the 2nd Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 34 years old. Atwood is buried in CWGC Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, France. 

Born in Montague, Prince Edward Island, Canada, Atwood was the son of Annie and Donald Mackay. He enlisted in Canadian forces in December 1914, and during his service he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and was twice mentioned in dispatches. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘The passing of his life left a sorrow far and wide’. 

 

25.10.18 Lieutenant Colonel Herbert YoungLieutenant Colonel Herbert Young

Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Young of the 11th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment), died 100 years ago on the Western Front in France. He was 36 years old. Herbert is buried in CWGC Pommereuil British Cemetery

He had previously served in the South African war. 

Born in 1882, Herbert was the husband of Mrs. A. Young, of Craigantaggart, Dunkeld, Perthshire. He served in the British Army in South Africa and then during the First World War he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order twice. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Of such an one will I glory.’ 

 

 

24.10.18 Lieutenant Joseph Macintyre Taylor

Joseph Macintyre Taylor Lieutenant Joseph Macintyre Taylor of the 2nd Battalion, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 21 years old. Joseph has no known grave and is commemorated by the CWGC on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial

Born in 1897, Joseph was the only son of J. M. Taylor, of Linburn, Shandon, Dumbartonshire. He volunteered for overseas service in 1914. Joseph served in Salonkia and France, and was wounded four times during the War. He was killed in action during the Battle of the Selle.

 

23.10.18 Serjeant Henry Nicholas VC

Serjeant Henry Nicholas VC

Serjeant Henry Nicholas of the 12th Nelson Company, 1st Battalion Canterbury Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Forces, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 27 years old. Henry is buried in Vertigneul Churchyard France.

 

Born in 1891, in Lincoln, New Zealand, Henry was one of four sons of Richard and Hannah Nicholas. He attended Christchurch Normal and later East schools. He volunteered for overseas service in 1916 and fought in the Battles of Messines and Passchendaele in 1917. In December 1917 he fought at Polderhoek Chateau and for his actions during an attack here he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

 

He travelled to England in July to receive his medal from King George V at Buckingham Palace. Retuned to the Western Front, he fought during the 100 days Offensive, winning the Military Medal. Henry was killed while on guard duty near Le Quesnoy. He was a well-known and much liked soldier and many of his comrades attended his funeral which was presided over by the Bishop of Nelson.

 

21.10.18 Lieutenant Gordon Johnston 

Lieutenant Gordon Johnston

Lieutenant Gordon Johnston of the 1st/4th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment, died in Iraq 100 years ago today. He was 35 years old. Gordon is buried in CWGC Bagdad (North Gate) War Cemetery.

Whilst the current climate of political instability persists it is extremely challenging for the Commission to manage or maintain its cemeteries and memorials located within Iraq. A two volume Roll of Honour listing all casualties, including Gordon, buried and commemorated in Iraq has been produced. These volumes are on display at the Commission's Head Office in Maidenhead and are available for the public to view.

 

21.10.18 2nd Lieutenant Philip Colley

 

2nd Lieutenant Philip ColleySecond Lieutenant Philip Colley of the Royal Field Artillery, died 100 years ago today in the UK. He was 32 years old. Philip is buried in Aldershot Military Cemetery.

 

Born in 1886, in Writtle Park, Essex, Philip was the seventh son of Philip and Lucy Agnes Colley, of 13 Hyde Park Terrace, London. He was educated at Stonyhurst College, Lancashire. He briefly worked as an accountant before travelling to India to work in his brother’s engineering business. While in India he served in with Calcutta Light Horse.

 

In 1916 he was commissioned in the Royal Field Artillery and returned to England for training in Brighton. In December 1917 he arrived on the Western Front but was badly gassed in April 1918. He returned to the UK for treatment but never recovered. He was been briefly well enough to visit his family a few days before he died.

 

20.10.18 Captain Frank Quigley

 

Captain Frank QuigleyCaptain Frank Quigley of the Royal Air Force died 100 years ago today. He was 24 years old. Frank is buried in Toronto (Mount Pleasant) Cemetery, Ontario, Canada.

 

Born in Toronto, Canada, Frank was the son of Robert and Annie Primrose Quigley. He served with the Canadian Engineers and fought at Ypres and the Somme before joining the Royal Flying Corps in early 1917. He was a natural flyer and by early 1918 he was a flying ace, having achieved 33 aerial victories. He was twice awarded the Military Cross, and also the Distinguished Service Order.

In April 1918, he was wounded and returned to Canada to recover. He was on-route back to the Western Front when he contracted Spanish Flu and died.

19.10.18 Private William Burbridge Private William Burbridge

 

Private William Burbridge of the 1st Battalion, Royal Newfoundland Regiment, died 100 years ago today. He was 24 Years old. William was laid to rest in St. John’s General Protestant Cemetery, Newfoundland, Canada.

 

He was the son of George and Charlotte Burbridge of Epworth, Burin, Newfoundland. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Many a weary path I’ve travelled in the darkest storm and strife’.

 

 

18.10.18 Major The Hon. Charles Lyell

Major The Hon. Charles Lyell

Major The Honourable Charles Lyell of the Royal Garrison Artillery, died of pneumonia 100 years ago today in the USA. He was 43 years old. Charles is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, USA.

Born in 1875, Charles was the only son of 1st Baron Lyell, of Kinnordy, and was the husband of the Hon. Mrs. C. H. Lyell, of 1 Cadogan Gardens, London. He was educated at Eton, and New College, Oxford.

In 1904 he was elected to parliament to represent East Dorset. In 1906 was appointed as the Private Secretary to Sir Edward Grey, the Foreign Secretary, and then in 1911 as Private Secretary to Herbert Asquith, the Prime Minister.

In 1910 Charles became the Liberal party Member of Parliament for South Edinburgh but in 1917 he resigned his seat and joined the forces. He was working in Washington as the Assistant Military Attaché to the British Embassy when he caught pneumonia and died.

His son, Captain Charles Lyell VC, was killed in action in North Africa during the Second World War.  

Chaplain 4th Class The Rev. Theodore Bayley Hardy, VCChaplain 4th Class The Rev. Theodore Bayley Hardy, VC

Chaplain 4th Class The Rev. Theodore Bayley Hardy, VC DSO MC of the Army Chaplains’ Department died of wounds 100 years ago in France. He was 54 years old. Theodore is buried in CWGC St. Sever Cemetery Extension, France.

 

Born in Exeter in 1863, Theodore was initially rejected from the forces in 1914 as he was 51 years old. He persisted, and in 1916 joined up and went to France. He soon became renowned for his devotion to his men, frequently risking his life in forward positions, no-man’s land, and during attacks, to bring aid and comfort, especially to the wounded.

 

In 1918 he was awarded the Victoria Cross for ‘fearlessness, devotion’, and was appointed as Chaplain to His Majesty. A month after receiving his award from King George V he was wounded in action when he when to a forward position that was under heavy enemy fire to talk to the men. He is one of most highly decorated non-combatants in the history of the British Armed Forces.

17.10.18 Captain Charles Geoffrey Barton

Captain Charles Geoffrey BartonCaptain Charles Geoffrey Barton of the 6th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 28 years old. Charles is buried in CWGC Honnechy British Cemetery.

Born in 1890, Charles was the son of Colonel Baptist Barton, Aide-de-Camp to King George V (1910 to 1914) and Deputy Lieutenant, and Isabel Barton, of Portsalon, County Donegal, Ireland, and was the husband of Letty Barton, of The Garth, Ashford, Kent. John enlisted in 1914 and during his service was awarded the Military Cross.  Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’Yet is their hope full of immortality.’

16.10.18 Corporal John McNamara VC

Corporal John McNamara

Corporal John McNamara of the East Surrey Regiment, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front near the French town of Solesmes. He was 29 years old. John is buried in CWGC Romeries Communal Cemetery, France.

 

Born in Lancashire in 1889, John was the son of John and Margaret McNamara, and husband of Mary Ann, of 82 Stone Row, School Lane, Preston. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Thy will be done.’

 

Six weeks before he was killed he performed an action of ‘conspicuous bravery, initiative, and devotion to duty…’ and was awarded the Victoria Cross. He did not live to receive the award, and his wife, Mary Ann, collected the medal from the King at Buckingham Palace on 27 February 1920. 


Click here to read an account of the action from the London Gazette on his CWGC page

 

Commander Evan Bunbury15.10.18 Commander Evan Bunbury

 

Commander Evan Bunbury of the HMCMB No. 71A, Royal Navy died 100 years ago today.

He has no known grave and is commemorated in the UK by the CWGC at the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

 

He was the Director of the Transport and Movements Department.

 

14.10.18 Major General Louis Lipsett

 

Major General Louis Lipsett

Major General Louis Lipsett, General Staff, Commander of the 4th Division, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 44 years old. Louis is buried in CWGC Queant Communal Cemetery British Extension, France.

 

Born in 1874 in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, Ireland, Louis was the son of Richard and Etty Lipsett. He grew up in Merthyr Tydfil in Wales before leaving to attend Bedford Grammar School. He went on to attend Sandhurst and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Royal Irish Regiment in 1894. He served during the Tirah Campaign on the Indian north-western frontier, and during the Second Boer War.

Highly competent and battle experienced, in 1911 Louis was promoted to Major and sent to Canada to establish military training schools. He was personally responsible for training many of the next generation of Canadian officers. 

During the First World War he led the 8th (90th Rifles) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, which he commanded during the famous German gas attack at Ypres in April 1915. Louis is credited with issuing the first order to counteract the effects of poison gas, ordering his men to urinate on strips of cloth and tie them to their faces.

In June 1916 he was given command of the 3rd Canadian Division. Louis led them through the battles of the Somme, Vimy, Passchendaele and Amiens, and he became widely regarded as one of the best Canadian officers of the Great War. He was adored and respected by his men, and his division became one of the finest formations in the British Army.

In September 1918 he was given command of the 4th British Division. A month later he was crawling along a bank overlooking the River Selle to observe enemy positions when he was spotted by a German machine gun. Louis was hit in the head. He staggered back to the British lines but died soon after. He was the last General officer to die during the War.

His funeral was attended by the Prince of Wales and many fellow officers. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Out of the stress of the doing into the peace of the done.’

13.10.18 Lieutenant Alfred Bussell

Lieutenant Alfred BussellLieutenant Alfred Bussell of the 10th Brigade, Australian Field Artillery, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 27 years old. Alfred is buried in CWGC Busigny Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

Born in 1891 in Wallcliffe, West Australia, Alfred was the son of Alfred John Bussell. Before the First World War he was a Surveyor. He volunteered for overseas service in October 1915 as a private. He transferred to the artillery in early 1916 and trained at St Johns Wood in London. He quickly rose through the ranks and in May 1917 he was made an officer. He fought in the 3rd Battle of Ypres, and was awarded the Military Cross in October 1917 following the Battle of Polygon Wood.

Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘When the dawn breaks, then shall the shadows flee’.

 

12.10.18 Second Lieutenant Norman Surry

Second Lieutenant Norman SurrySecond Lieutenant Norman Surry of the 16th Battalion (Church Lads Brigade), King’s Royal Rifle Corps, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France.

After the First World War Norman’s body was recovered from the battlefield but could not be identified, and so he was commemorated on the CWGC Vis-en-Artois Memorial to the Missing. In 2016, a researcher brought evidence to the attention of the CWGC showing that the grave of an unidentified Second Lieutenant buried in CWGC Montay-Neuvilly Road Cemetery was that of Norman Surry. 100 years after his death, his grave was rededicated with a new CWGC headstone bearing his name.

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11.10.18 Lieutenant Wallace Algie, VC

Lieutenant Wallace AlgieLieutenant Wallace Algie of the 20th (Central Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 23 years old. Wallace is buried in CWGC Niagara Cemetery, Iwuy.

 

Born in 1891, in Alton, Ontario, Wallace was the only son of Dr. James Algie and Rachel Algie of 1155, King Street, Toronto. Before the War he was an accountant and worked for the Bank of Toronto and was an officer with the Canadian Militia. He was also an accomplished musician, and was a bandsman with the 48th Highlanders.

 

Wallace volunteered for active service in April 1916 as a private soldier, despite having served as an officer in the Militia. He trained at Camp Borden before being pulled from the ranks and made an officer. He was sent to France in September 1916.

 

He was killed in action at Iwuy, near the French town of Cambrai. For his actions on the day he died Wallace was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross. Click here to read an account of the action from the London Gazette on his CWGC page

 

10.10.18 Lieutenant Colonel Philip Kelly

Lieutenant Colonel Philip KellyLieutenant Colonel Philip Kelly of the 9th (North Irish Horse) Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front in Belgium. He was 29 years old. Philip is buried in CWGC Dadizeele New British Cemetery.

 

Born in Dublin in 1889, Philip was the son of William Edward and Edith May Kelly, of St. Helens, Westport, County Mayo, Ireland; and was husband of Elizabeth Constance Louise Kelly, of Fairmount House, Mount Vale, York. A soldier before the War, Philip served with the 5th Royal Irish Fusiliers during the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915 before transferring to fight on the Western Front.

Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘He leaves a white, unbroken glory, a shining peace, under the night.’

9.10.18 Lieutenant John Cooke

 

Lieutenant John CookeLieutenant John Cooke of the Mechanical Transport section of the Army Service Corps attached to the Royal Garrison Artillery, died 100 years ago today in France. He was 25 years old. John is buried in CWGC Tourgeville Military Cemetery.

 

Born in 1893, John was the only son of William and Nancie Cooke, of The Thorns, Cheadle Hulme, Cheshire. He volunteered for overseas service in 1914 and arrived in France in August 1916. He fell ill in late 1918 with Spanish Flu and was brought to Touville for treatment in one of the many hospitals based in the town.

Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘To live in the hearts of those we love is not to die.’

8.10.18 Captain Philip Egerton

 

Captain Philip EgertonCaptain Philip Egerton of the 19th (Queen Alexandra’s Own Royal) Hussars, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 23 years old. Philip is buried in CWGC Busigny Communal Cemetery Extension.

Born in 1895, Philip was the son of Sir Philip Henry Brian Grey Egerton, 12th Baronet of Oulton Park, Cheshire, and Mary Carolyn Campbell Grey Egerton. Philip was heir to the baronetcy of Egerton, a title dating back to 1617. He was educated at Eton and Cambridge University.

Philip’s 19 year old twin brother, Rowland, also served, and was killed in action in 1914. Upon Philip’s headstone are inscribed the words, ‘His life’s course run, his duty done.’

 

7.10.1918 Private Rankin Wheary

 

Private Rankin WhearyPrivate Rankin Wheary of the 26th Battalion (New Brunswick Regiment) Canadian Infantry, was killed in action in Bourlon Wood 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of Cambrai, 1918. Rankin is buried in CWGC Bourlon Wood Cemetery.

 

Born in December 1895, in Woodstock, New Brunswick, Canada, Rankin was the son of Jessie Wheary. Before the War he worked as a labourer. Rankin volunteered for overseas service in January 1916. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘In memory of my beloved brother Ranking, from his sister Elsie Diggs’.

6.10.1918 Private James Amos

Private James AmosPrivate James Amos of the 15th (48th Highlanders of Canada) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 24 years old. James is buried in CWGC Duisans British Cemetery, Etrun, France.

 

Born in Scotland, James was the son of William and Isabella Amos, of 4, George Place, Peebles. He emigrated to Canada with his three brothers and worked as a butcher before the outbreak of the First World War. In late 1917 he volunteered for overseas service with Canadian Forces. He arrived in France in January 1918. On 6 October he was wounded in the head, legs and arms by an enemy shell. He was taken to the 1st Canadian Casualty Clearing Station at Duisans where he died. The officer who buried him wrote to his mother and said, ‘I have just come back from the cemetery…where we have committed his body into God’s keeping…I know how heart-broken you will be, and how hard it is to bear the loss of one whom one had brought into the world and watched grow up to manhood, but you may at least have the consolation of knowing that your son died a brave death, giving up his life for his country…’

5.10.1918 Second Lieutenant Donald Osborne

Second Lieutenant Donald OsborneSecond Lieutenant Donald Osborne of the Royal Air Force was killed 100 years ago today in an air crash. He was 22 years old. Donald is buried in Upavon Cemetery, Wiltshire, England.

 

Born in Toronto, Donald was the son of Robert Bryson and Charlotte Mary Osborne, of The Hotel Kress, Preston, Ontario, Canada. His brother served with Canadian Forces in France during the War, and his mother was a Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse in London. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Beloved son of Bryson & Charlotte Osborne’.

4.10.18 Brigadier General Sir William Kay, CMG

 

Brigadier General Sir William KayBrigadier General Sir William Kay of the Kings Royal Rifle Corps, commanding the 3rd Brigade, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 42 years old. William is buried in CWGC Vadencourt British Cemetery, Maissemy.

 

Born in 1876, William was the son of Lieutenant Colonel Sir Walter Kay, 5th Baronet of East Sheen, Surrey. William was a soldier before the outbreak of the First World War and served in Sierra Leone and South Africa. In 1914 he was on the staff of Sir John French, the Commander of British Expeditionary Force in France.  He received the Distinguished Service Order following a daring reconnaissance mission in October but was badly wounded and returned to England. That same month he became the 6th Baron of East Sheen following the death of his father.  

 

William returned to France in 1916 and served on the staff of the 24th Division until March 1918 when he was given command of the 2nd Brigade. After just a fortnight in command he was hit in the face by bullet and spent a month recovering, during which time he was made a companion of the Order of St Michael and St George. In April 1918, he took command of the 3rd Brigade. In October, while reconnoitring a forward position near Magny-la-Fosse, William was killed by enemy shell fire.

 

William had no children, and 99 years after its creation, the Baronetcy of East Sheen ended. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘There is no death, what seems so is transition.’

 

3.10.18 Lieutenant Maxwell Barrows

Lieutenant Maxwell BarrowsLieutenant Maxwell Barrows of the 1st/5th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment), was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France.  He was 20 years old. Maxwell is buried in CWGC Bellicourt British Cemetery.

 

Born in 1895 in Nottingham, Maxwell was the only son of George and Jane Barrows. Maxwell had received a scholarship to Pembroke College, Oxford, but in 1916 he decided to leave university and join the Army. He went on to win the Military Cross during the storming of the St Quentin Canal, one of the most dramatic events of 100 days period.

Click here to discover more about this remarkable young man

3.10.18 Captain Geoffrey Cowper

Captain Geoffrey Cowper Captain Geoffrey Cowper of the Royal Army Medical Corps, died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 27 years old. Geoffrey is buried in CWGC Duisans British Cemetery.

Born in Darlington in 1891, Geoffrey was the son of Walter Spencer and Sarah Anna Cowper of 67 Duke Street, Darlington. Before the War Geoffrey was a medical student. Geoffrey was attached to the 5th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment and during his service he was mentioned in dispatches.  Upon his headstone are inscribed the words,’ Be thou faithful unto death and I will give thee a crown of life.’

2.10.18 Captain Fred Reynolds
Captain Fred Reynolds

 

Captain Fred Reynolds of the 15th Battalion, the Hampshire Regiment, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in Belgium. He was 30 years old. Fred is buried in CWGC Perth Cemetery (China Wall).

 

Born in 1888 in the Yorkshire town of Ilkley, Fred was the the son of R. F. Reynolds and Amy Dora Reynolds. Before the War he had been an artist. His younger brother was a medical student, and his mother and sister were authors. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘For us.’

1.10.18 Rifleman Walter SmithRifleman Walter Smith

 

Rifleman Walter Smith of the 12th (Central Antrim) Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles, died as a prisoner of war 100 years ago today on the Western Front in Belgium. He was 23 years old. Walter has no known grave and is commemorated on the CWGC Ploegsteert Memorial.

 

Born in 1895, Walter was the son of Captain Walter Smith and Melita Smith, of 115 Rusthall Avenue, Bedford Park, London.

30.9.18 Captain Arthur Simpkin

Captain Arthur SimpkinCaptain Arthur Simpkin of the 8th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s Own), died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Ruyaulcourt Military Cemetery.

Born in 1896, Arthur was the son of John William and Emily Simpkin, of Norton Royd, Woodkirk, Dewsbury, Yorkshire. Arthur’s brother, Captain Harry Simpkins, was also killed in 1918. Harry has no known grave and so upon Arthur’s headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Also in memory of his brother, Captain H.H. Simpkin, Age 21, 13th York’s Reg. 22.3.1918, Have faith in God.’ 

29.9.18 Captain Alan Duncan

Captain Alan DuncanCaptain Alan Duncan of the 75th (Mississauga) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, was killed in action on the Western Front near the French town of Cambrai 100 years ago today. He was 20 years old. He is buried in CWGC Cantimpre Canadian Cemetery, France.

Born in Unionville in 1897, Alan was the youngest son of Helena Duncan and the Reverend George Petrie Duncan. A student before the War, Alan volunteered in October 1915. He fought with Canadian forces during the Battles of St. Eloi and the Somme in 1916 but then fell ill with appendicitis and was sent back to Canada. He was given the option to remain but decided to return to Europe. Back on the Western Front he fought during the Battle of Passchendaele in 1917, where he awarded the Military Cross for bravery. In March 1918 he was promoted to Captain and he went on to fight during the Battle of Amiens in August 1918. Alan was killed in combat during the Battle of the Canal Du Nord while he was acting second in command of his battalion. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘He was lovely and pleasant in his life and died in glory.’

Alan’s father served as a chaplain during the War and his two older brothers, George and Wallace, also served in Canadian forces. His brother, Captain George Duncan, was killed in action in May 1915.  

29.9.18 Private George Fowler

Private George FowlerPrivate George Fowler of the 59th Battalion, Australian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of the St Quentin Canal. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Bellicourt British Cemetery.

Born 1896 in Coburg, Victoria, George was the son of Lucretia and George Fowler. He worked as a carpenter in Drouin, south-east of Melbourne before the War. He volunteered for active service in 1916 and just before leaving he married Gladys Clare who gave birth to a little girl in early 1917.

Click here to discover the remarkable story of an “ordinary” Australian soldier

28.9.18 Private Herbert Mouat

Private Herbert MouatPrivate Herbert Mouat of the 6th Battalion, Australian Infantry, died in hospital of wounds 100 years ago today. He was 30 years old. He is buried in CWGC Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey.

Herbert was born in Cowwarr, Gippsland, Victoria, and was the son of Montalto and Hannah; and husband of Rubena, of "Holly Cottage," Buckingham Avenue, Springvale, Victoria, Australia. Working as labourer before the war, Herbert enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in August 1915. He fought in France with the 6th Battalion Australian Infantry throughout 1916 and 1917 however he is recorded as being absent without leave on no less than seven occasions, amongst other military crimes, and was punished according to military law. Despite this he always returned to duty.
Often ill during his service, he spent a period of time in the UK during 1917 recovering from diphtheria. He returned to his unit in France in September 1917 however one month later, during the 3rd Battle of Ypres, he was very badly wounded in action, receiving a gunshot wound to his spine. He was evacuated to the UK and admitted Tooting Military Hospital in London. There was very little that could be done for him except ease his pain. Almost a year after he was wounded he died.

27.9.18 Chief Petty Officer George Prowse, VCChief Petty Officer George Prowse

Chief Petty Officer George Prowse of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, was killed 100 years ago today while serving in the Drake Battalion of the Royal Naval Division at Anneux in France. He was 32 years old. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the CWGC Vis-en-Artois Memorial, France

Born in Gilfach Goch, Llantrisant, Wales, George was the son of John and Sara Prowse of number 65 Pentre-Treharne Road, Landore, Swansea.

Less than a month before he was killed George was awarded the Victoria Cross. Click here to read an account of the action from the London Gazette on his CWGC page.

26.9.18 Lieutenant Cecil Hudson

Lieutenant Cecil Hudson

Lieutenant Cecil Hudson of the 8th Battalion, (Manitoba Regiment), Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 25 years old. He is buried in CWGC Queant Road Cemetery, Buissy.

Born in London, England, Cecil was the son of Arthur Henry and Ellen Louisa Hudson. He volunteered to serve as a private soldier but was promoted from the ranks during the War. During his service he won the Distinguished Conduct Medal, and the Military Medal twice. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Greater love hath no man than this.’

25.9.18 Private Edward Hunt

Private Edward HuntPrivate Edward Hunt of the 13th Battalion, Duke of Wellingtons's (West Riding Regiment), died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 19 years old. He is buried in CWGC Vieille Chapelle New Military Cemetery.

Born in 1899, Edward was the son of Alfred Walter and Annie Hunt, of "Rothesay" 79 Church Road., Manor Park, Essex. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Father in thy gracious keeping, leave we now thy servant sleeping.’

24.9.18 Lieutenant Cecil Coster

Lieutenant Cecil Coster

Lieutenant Cecil Coster of the 17th Squadron, Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry), was killed in action at Samak in Palestine 100 years ago today. He was 26 years old. He is buried in CWGC Haifa War Cemetery, Israel.

Born in 1892, in Bethnal Green, London, Cecil was the son of Vincent and Caroline Coster, of 98 Hastings Road, Maidstone. During his service he was awarded the Military Cross. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘An only son, never forgotten, beloved by all who knew him.’

 

23.9.18 Risaldar Badlu Singh, VC

Risaldar Badlu SinghRisaldar Badlu Singh of the 29th (Deccan Horse) Lancers died 100 years ago today in Palestine. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the CWGC Helopolis (Port Tewfik) Memorial.

Badlu was a Hindu Jat, born on 13 January 1876 in Dhakla, in the Punjab, India. He was first sent to France before being withdrawn with other Indian forces to fight in Palestine. For his actions on the day he died he was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

Click here to discover more about the actions which led to him being awarded the Victoria Cross.

23.9.18 Major Thakur Dalpat Singh

Major Thakur Dalpat Singh

Major Thakur Dalpat Singh of the Jodhpur (Imperial Service) Lancers, was killed in action 100 years ago today in Palestine. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the CWGC Heliopolis (Port Tewfik) Memorial.

Born in November 1892 to a Rajput noble family, he was the son of Thakur Hari Singh, of Deoli, Pali, Jodhpur, Rajputana. Educated at Eastbourne College in England, he joined the British Army in 1913. During the First World War fought on the Western Front until his unit was redeployed to Palestine in 1918. He was awarded the Military Cross in July 1918. He was killed in action during the capture of Haifa.

22.9.18 Captain Keith Brown

Captain Keith BrownCaptain Keith Brown of The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment), died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Five Points Cemetery, Lechelle.

Born in London in 1896, Keith was the son of George Andrews and Alice Alexandra of 18 Croham Park Avenue, Croydon, Surrey. Educated at Dulwich College he was a member of the school Cadet Corps and upon the outbreak of the First World War he volunteered as a Private soldier.

 He served in France and Flanders from November 1914, where he saw much fighting. In May 1915 he returned home and entered Sandhurst, being gazetted as a Second Lieutenant in October. Returned to France, he fought on the Somme in 1916 and was badly wounded during the Battle of High Wood and returned to England to recover. Back in France by January 1917 he was promoted to Lieutenant in July. On 22 September he suffered terrible wounded in action near the French village of Éphey, and died soon after. His commanding officer said that, ‘I was extremely attached to him; indeed he was a general favourite wherever he went.’  Soon after his death it was announced in the London gazette that he had been promoted to Captain. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Love will lead us to our loved again.’

Just fifteen days after Keith was killed, his older brother Captain Clive Andrews Brown of the Royal Engineers died as well.

21.9.18 Lieutenant George Brownrigg-Jay

Lieutenant George Brownrigg-Jay

Lieutenant George Brownrigg-Jay of the 124th Company, Machine Gun Corps, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 24 years old. He is buried in CWGC Villers-Faucon Communal Cemetery Extension.

Born in September 1894 in Ascot, Berkshire, George was the son of Major Harvey Brownrigg-Jay, and Kate Belleville Buselle, of Flaghead, Canford Cliffs, Dorset. He volunteered for overseas service upon the outbreak of the First World War. In 1917, he returned to England and married Gladys Norgrave Douglas at Parish Chapel, St Pancras.

20.9.18 Serjeant Albert Chan

Serjeant Albert ChanSerjeant Albert Chan of the 1st Battalion, British West Indies Regiment, was killed in action by enemy shell fire during the capture of Damiah Bridge in Palestine, 100 years ago today. He was 26 years old. He is buried in CWGC Jerusalem War Cemetery.

Born in British Guiana, Albert was the son of Austin and Sarah Chan who were of Chinese Heritage. During his service he was Mentioned in Dispatches.


19.9.18 Lieutenant Leonard Forbes

Lieutenant Leonard Forbes

Lieutenant Leonard Forbes of the 9th Battalion, the Essex Regiment, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He is buried in CWGC Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery.

Born in 1883, Leonard was the son of John and Rosa Forbes of Dulwich. He volunteered for overseas service with the London Scottish in August 1914, and fought in France from November.  In December 1915, he returned to England and married Beatrice Mary Kingwill. It is believed that Leonard was killed by shell fire while his battalion was in support near the French village of Épehy, they had taken part in the Battle of Épehy the previous day. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Setting duty first he went at once as to a sacrament.’

18.9.18 Major Thomas Breen 

Major Thomas Breen Major Thomas Breen of the 142nd Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He is buried at CWGC Morchies Australian Cemetery.

The son of Inspector General Breen, Thomas was born in 1889 in Dublin. He attended Trinity College, Dublin, where he took his B.A and M.B degrees. He received a commission as a Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps in February 1914.

Upon the outbreak of the First World War he was deployed with the British Expeditionary Force to France and Flanders. Promoted to Captain he took part in the retreat from Mons, and in the operations on the Aisne. He was then promoted to be the Regimental Medical Officer of the 1st Rifle Brigade and was twice appointed Deputy Assistant Director of Medical Services.

In 1918 he was promoted to Major, and in March was attached to the 142nd Field Ambulance which he commanded throughout the desperate days of the German Spring Offensive. He was killed on 18 September, while trying to rescue a wounded German soldier.

An account written after the war states that, ’his coolness and bravery were known to all. It was, in fact, his zeal and unselfish devotion to duty that cost him his life…He was very popular with everyone, and such a splendid soldier, his men would follow him everywhere.’

17.9.1918 Private Reginald Bagnell

Private Reginald Bagnell

Private Reginald Bagnell of the 4th Battalion, Canadian Machine Gun Corps, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 21 years old. He is buried in CWGC Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille.

Born in 1897, Reginald was the son of Mr and Mrs J.M. Bagnell of Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada. He died of a gunshot wound to the arm and right leg in No. 54 General Hospital, Aubengue. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Darling your race is run and victory won, and now your record’s in the sky, Father & Mother.’


16.9.18 Lieutenant Robert Darling

Robert DarlingLieutenant Robert Darling of the 1st/9th Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment), died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 27 years old. He is buried in CWGC Ecoust-St.Mein British Cemetery.

Born in the West Hartlepool village of Hart in 1891, Robert was the son of Robert and Dorothy Darling. During his service he was awarded the Military Cross. Robert and a fellow officer were killed when they were ambushed by an enemy patrol while reconnoitring the front line near the village of Bullecourt. Their bodies were brought back by the men of Robert’s battalion. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘and so shall they ever be with the Lord.’

15.9.18 Gunner Albert Gilmore

Albert GilmoreGunner Albert Gilmore of the 6th Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 34 years old. He is buried in CWGC Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille.

Born in 1884, Albert was the oldest son of Mrs A. H. Gilmore of Toronto, Canada. Before the war he worked as a compositor for the Toronto Star Newspaper and his wife worked as a nurse. Albert volunteered for overseas service in 1915 and trained at the Canadian artillery school in Kingston before leaving for France. Twice wounded during his service, on 9 September 1918 he was caught in a gas attack. Six days later he died in No. 54 General Hospital in Aubengue, France.

14.9.18 Second Lieutenant Vivian Sutton

Vivian SuttonSecond Lieutenant Vivian Sutton of the 2nd/20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich) London Regiment was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front near the French village of Haverincourt. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Ruyaulcourt Military Cemetery.

Born in 1896, Vivian was the son of Charles and Amelia Sutton of Sidcup Kent. He was educated at Rugby School and went on to work as a Chartered Accountant. He volunteered for active service upon the outbreak of the First World War and by 1918 he had served in Ireland, Greece, Egypt, Palestine and France.

Read more about this remarkable young soldier

14.9.18 Private Philip Le Cornu

Philip Le CornuPrivate Philip Le Cornu of the 14th (Royal Montreal) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today. He was 24 Years old. He is buried in St. Mary Churchyard, Jersey.

Born on the Channel Island of Jersey in 1894, Philip was the son of Philip Francis and Mary Le Cornu. Before the war he worked as a clerk. While working in Canada Philip volunteered in September 1916 to serve with Canadian forces. He arrived in France in May 1917 but was badly wounded in the legs in August. He was taken to the 58th Casualty Clearing Station and then evacuated to England for care. He succumbed to his wounds over a year later in the 16th Canadian General Hospital in Orpington, London. His family requested that he be buried at home on Jersey. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’Until the day dawns’.

13.9.18 Private James Crawford

Private James CrawfordPrivate James Crawford of the 19th (Central Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 24 years old. He is buried in CWGC Dominion Cemetery, Hendecourt-Les-Cagnicourt.

Born in Toronto in 1894, James was the son of Hugh and Isabelle Crawford. When he volunteered James wrote to his mother and said, ‘think of what the poor Belgians are suffering. It is right that I should go and help them’. After being at the front for some time one of his last letters home said, ’Do not worry, mother. If you get a telegram compose yourself before you open it, and always hope for the best. Perhaps it will only announce that I am wounded.’

James’ death was a tragic mistake. After being briefly separated from his comrades while on a patrol he was approaching to re-join them and, believing him to be one of the enemy, they shot and killed him. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Ever remembered by his loving mother, sisters & Brother.’

Private George Crawford

12.9.18 Private George Crawford

Private George Crawford of the 28th (Northwest) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago on the Western Front. He was 23 years old. He is buried in CWGC Duisans British Cemetery.

George was on sentry duty on 10 September 1918 when he was badly wounded in the left chest and arms. He was immediately tended to and then evacuated to No.1 Canadian Casualty Clearing Station based at Duisans. Despite the best efforts of the medical staff he succumbed to his wounds two days later.

11.9.18 Private John Beckwith

Private John BeckwithPrivate John Beckwith served with 3rd Canadian Divisional Employment Company of the Canadian Labour Corps on the Western Front. He died 100 years ago today at the 42nd Casualty Clearing Station after being shot in the abdomen. He was 39 years old. He is buried in CWGC Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension in France.

John was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Beckwith of London, England. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘God be with you dear Dad, till we meet again, Grace, Elsie & Edith’.

10.9.18 Private William McMaster

Private William McMasterPrivate William McMaster of the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 21 years old. He is buried in CWGC Terlincthun British Cemetery.

Born in 1897 in Stratford, Ontario, Canada, William was the son of John and Agnes McMaster. Before the War he worked as a clerk. He volunteered for overseas service in November 1915 and arrived on the Western Front in April 1917. In September he was gassed and returned to England for treatment in the Canadian hospital at Shorncliffe. He returned to the Western Front in April 1918 but in August he was gassed again. William was sent to number 7 Stationary Hospital at Boulogne but 15 days later he succumbed to his wounds. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘May his reward be as great as his sacrifice’.

9.9.18 Major Eric Connelly

Major Eric ConnellyMajor Eric Connelly of the 3rd Australian Division Head Quarters died of wounds 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 29 years old. He is buried in CWGC Heath Cemetery, Harbonnieres.

Born in 1888 in Bendigo, Victoria, Eric was the son of Frances and Thomas Jefferson Connelly. He studied at Carlton College and went on to receive a law degree from Melbourne University. Upon the outbreak of the First World War he volunteered for overseas service and fought on Gallipoli where he was badly wounded and where his brother died. After recovering in Australia he was sent to France and fought during the Battle of Messines in 1917. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for ‘gallant service and devotion to duty’, but was badly gassed. His wounds meant he could no longer serve on the front line and so he was appointed to the General Staff. On the night of 8 September 1918 he was wounded during a German air raid and died the following day. His wife was on route to see him, arriving from Australian only to discover he had been killed. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘to conquer is to live enough’.

8.9.18 Private Delbert Greenwood

Private Delbert Greenwood

Private Delbert Greenwood of the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front in France. He was 20 years old. He has no known grave and is commemorated by the CWGC on the Vimy Memorial in France.

Born in 1898 in Cedarbrae, Ontario, Canada, Delbert was the son of Francis Xavier and Martha Greenwood, of Virginia, Ontario. Before the war he was a farmer. He had been in France 10 months when he was killed in action.

7.9.18 Private Charles Short

Private Charles Short

Private Charles Short of the 3rd (Toronto) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died of wounds 100 years ago today. He was 23 years old. He is buried in Twyford (St. Mary) Churchyard, UK.

Born in Bristol in 1894, Charles and his family immigrated to Canada in 1902 and lived in Hamilton. Charles volunteered for active service in 1916 with the Canadian Army. While in England he married Annie Short of number 97 Queen’s Road, Reading before traveling to France. After a year in France he was badly wounded in action during the Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line in early September 1918, suffering paralysis from a gunshot wound. He was evacuated to England but died five days later in No.4 London General Hospital, Demark Hill. Annie requested that he be buried close to her, and so he was laid to rest in Berkshire. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words,’We miss him most who loved him best’.

7.9.18 Second Lieutenant William Smith

Second Lieutenant William SmithSecond Lieutenant William Smith of the Royal Air Force, died 100 years ago today in Egypt. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Cairo War Memorial Cemetery.

Born in Montreal, Canada, in 1896 William was the son of William Henry and Clara Smith. Before the War he worked for the Grand Trunk Railway. He volunteered for oversea service in 1915 with the Canadian Army Medical Corps. He found himself working in the safety of a hospital in the UK but he wanted to see action so volunteered for the dangerous job of flying.

Click here to discover the story of this remarkable 22 year old pilot

6.9.18 Private Samuel Wilkinson

Private Samuel WilkinsonPrivate Samuel Wilkinson of the 1st/7th Durham Light Infantry, died 100 years ago today in German as a prisoner of war. He was 22 years old. He is buried in Berlin South-Western Cemetery, Germany.
 
Born in Leeds, Samuel was the son of Charles and Ada Wilkinson of number 19 Radcliffe Lane, Pudsey, Leeds. Before the war he worked as a grocer. He attested for service in December 1915, and was mobilised for active service in April 1916. On 26 March 1918, during the German Spring Offensive, he was shot in the spine and taken prisoner. He was cared for in a Red Cross Hospital in Maubeuge, Germany, until he finally succumbed to his wounds. He was buried in a nearby cemetery until 1924-25, when all British graves in Germany were concentrated into four cemeteries to ensure their continuing care. Upon his headstone is inscribed the Hebrew word, ‘Mizpah’, meaning watchtower.

5.9.18 Captain Richard Knight

Captain Richard KnightCaptain Richard Knight of the 4th Battalion of the Bedfordshire Regiment, died of wounds in hospital 100 years ago today. He was 37 years old. He is buried in CWGC St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.

Born in Chawton, Hampshire in 1881, Richard was the son of the Reverend Charles Knight, Rector of Chawton, and Emma Knight, of "Summerlands," South Farnborough, Hampshire. He studied at Oxford University before the War. It is believed that Richard was wounded during the Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line on 2-3 September 1918, and then transferred to the base hospitals at Rouen for recovery, later succumbing to his wounds.  The inscription upon his headstone reads, ’Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God’.

4.9.18 Trooper Christopher Allmond

Trooper Christopher Allmond

Trooper Christopher Allmond of the 9th Australian Light Horse, died of malaria in Egypt 100 years ago. He was 25 years old. He is buried in CWGC Port Said War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

Born in Cherryville, South Australia, Christopher was the son of Ann Elizabeth Allmond, and before the First World War he worked as a gardener. He volunteered for overseas service in January 1916, and served in Africa and the Middle East from September 1916 with the Australian battalion of the Imperial Camel Corps. Having fought through many battles, in May 1918 Christopher was admitted to hospital with malaria. In late August he was transferred to the Australian General Hospital in Port Said but he died four days later. He was buried by Chaplain Stanley Wain on 5 September 1918.

3.9.18 Lieutenant Walter Ward

Lieutenant Walter Ward

Lieutenant Walter Ward of the 171st Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Asiago Plateau in Italy. He was 20 years old. Walter is buried at CWGC Barenthal Military Cemetery, northern Italy.

Born in Camberwell, London, in 1898, Walter was the youngest son of Anthony Arthur, a General Practitioner in Camberwell, and Annie Amelia Ward, of number 12, Asylum Road, London. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Faithful unto death’.

2.9.18 Captain Geoffrey Bowen

Geoffrey BowenCaptain Geoffrey Bowen of the 2nd Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action during the Battle for the Drocourt-Queant line in France 100 years ago today. He was 23 years old. He is buried in CWGC Windmill British Cemetery, Monchy-Le-Preux, France.

Born in 1895 in Brentford, London, Geoffrey was the son of Winifred Mary Bowen. The family lived in Burley, near Brockenhurst, in the New Forest. Geffrey volunteered for active service in 1915, and fought in almost every major British battle on the Western Front, including the Battle of the Somme in 1916 where he was wounded.

Click here to discover the story of this remarkable 23 year old veteran soldier.

1.9.18 Major Geoffrey Bellamy

Geoffrey Bellamy Major Geoffrey Bellamy of the 4th Battalion of the Machine Gun Corps, died of wounds on the Western Front 100 years ago today during the Second Battle of Arras, 1918. He was 24 years old. He is buried in CWGC Ligny-St. Flochel British Cemetery, Averdoint, France.

Born in 1894, Geoffrey was the son of George and Florence Bellamy, of number 11 Hartley Avenue, Plymouth, and was a graduate of Exeter College, Oxford.

Geoffrey had been wounded before at the Battle of Messines in June 1917 but had quickly returned to the front in August. In late August 1918 he was wounded and brought to a Casualty Clearing Station based in the French village of Ligny-St. Flochel where he died. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘He died the noblest death a man may die’.

31.8.18 Serjeant Leigh Smith

Sergeant Leigh Smith

Serjeant Leigh Smith of the 72nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western Front at Bankswood near St. Ledger. He was 28 years old. He is buried in CWGC Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery.

Born is South Shields, Leigh was the son of John and Margaret Harper Smith of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He had been a soldier before the outbreak of war, serving with Northumberland Fusiliers from February 1911. During the First World War he served in France from April 1915, and was later transferred to the Royal Field Artillery. Leigh fought in Italy from November 1917, returning to France the following March. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘Blessed are the pure in heart’.

Peter Layard

30.8.18 Lieutenant Burnett Grosvenor

Lieutenant Burnett Grosvenor of the 3rd (Toronto) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of the Scarpe. He was 26 years old. He is buried in CWGC Valley Cemetery, Vis-en-Artois, France, with 26 other members of his battalion who were also killed in action 100 years ago today.

Burnett was the son of Mary and John Grosvenor of 33 Reedswood Road, Birchills, Walsall, England. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘He was a good son and devoted to his mother’.

Private Edward Tate

29.8.18 Private Edward Tate

Private Edward Tate of the 6th Battalion, the Northamptonshire Regiment, died of wounds 100 years ago today at the 41st Clearing Station, near Albert, on the Western Front. He was 19 years old. Edward is buried in CWGC Daours Communal Cemetery Extension.

Edward was the son of Richard and Emma Tate, of 67 Alsen Road, Holloway, London. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’One of the best’.

28.8.18 Major George Musgrove

Major George MusgroveMajor George Musgrove of the 20th (Central Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of the Scarpe. He was 36 years old. He is buried in CWGC Vis-En-Artois British Cemetery, France.

Born in Walsall, England, George was the son of William and Caroline Musgrove, and the husband of Eva Musgrove of Hanover, Ontario, Canada. Before 1914 he had worked as a Metallurgical Chemist, and had served in the forces during the Boer War. During the First World War he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Order and was Mentioned in Despatches.

27.8.18 Second Lieutenant Gerard Brassey

BrasseySecond Lieutenant Gerard Brassey of the 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 19 years old. He is buried in CWGC’s Mory Street Military Cemetery, St. Leger, France.

Educated at Eton, Gerard was the son of Sir Leonard Brassey, Member of Parliament for Northamptonshire North, and Lady Violet Brassey, of Apethorpe Hall, Peterborough.

26.8.18 Serjeant Joseph Harvey

Harvey

Serjeant Joseph Harvey of the 2nd/4th King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of the Scarpe. He was 29 years old. He is buried in CWGC H.A.C. Cemetery, Ecoust-St. Mein, France.

Joseph was the son of Charles and Louisa Harvey, of Great Barr, Birmingham, and husband of Mabel Harvey, of Moddershall, Stone, Staffordshire. Joseph had volunteered for overseas service upon the outbreak of war in 1914. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘He fought and died for England and the honour of his race’.

25.8.18 Private Charles Robert Mays 

Mays

Private Charles Robert Mays of the 21st Squadron, Machine Gun Corps, Middlesex Yeomanry (Cavalry), died 100 years ago today in Palestine. He was 27 years old. He is buried in CWGC Jerusalem War Cemetery.

Charles was the son of William and Helen Mays, of 13 Brimmington Road, Peckham, London. Charles enlisted in Chelsea in 1915, and fought in Egypt and Palestine for 3 years before his death. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’Thy will be done’.

24.8.18 Lieutenant Gilbert Adamson

Lieutenant Gilbert Adamson

Lieutenant Gilbert Adamson of the 1st/7th Battalion, the Middlesex Regiment, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 23 years old. He is buried in CWGC Bellacourt Military Cemetery, France.

Educated at the City of London School and Merton College, Oxford, Gilbert was the son of Professor John William of Kings College London and Amanda Adamson, of 44 Whitehall Park, Highgate, London. Two months before he was killed Gilbert was awarded the Military Cross for, ‘gallantry in the field’. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’Killed in action Croisilles, Quit you like men in your hands Lord’.

23.8.18 Lieutenant Thomas Brown

Lieutenant Thomas BrownLieutenant Thomas Brown of the 15th Battalion, 3rd New Zealand Rifle Brigade died on the Western Front 100 years ago today during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 36 years old. He is buried in CWGC Queens Cemetery, Bucquoy, France.

Born at Green Island, New Zealand, Thomas was the son of John and Lucy Brown, of 109, Don Steet., Invercargill, New Zealand. During his war service he was awarded the Military Cross.

23.8.18 Lieutenant Peter Layard

Lieutenant Peter Layard

Lieutenant Peter Layard of the 4th Battalion, the Suffolk Regiment, was killed in action 100 years ago today on the Western front while attempting to help a wounded German soldier. He was 22 years old. He is buried in CWGC Douchy-Les-Ayette British Cemetery, France.

Born in Malvern, Worcester, Peter was the son of George and Eleanor Layard. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ’Son of George Somes Layard, enamoured of life he went laughing into the arms of death’.

Click here to discover his story

22.8.18 Major Bertie Tower

Major Bertie Tower

Major Bertie Tower, commanding officer of the 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, was killed by enemy shell fire 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 30 years old. He is buried in CWGC Bellacourt Military Cemetery, France.

Bertie completed his officer training at Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in 1906. He became captain in 1915, and during his service he was awarded the Military Cross twice, and was Mentioned in Despatches three times.

Born at Chilton Lodge, Berkshire, Bertie was the son of Commander F. F. Tower of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and Laura Tower, of 66 Prince's Gate, South Kensington, London. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘His memory hallowed in the land he loved’.

21.8.18 Lieutenant Frank Hicks

Lieutenant Frank Hicks

Lieutenant Frank Hicks of the 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Second Battle of the Somme. He was 21 years old. Frank is buried in CWGC Bucquoy Road Cemetery, France.

He was the son of Alan and Alice Hicks, of The Stone House, Bolney, Sussex. During his service Frank was awarded the Military Cross. The inscription upon his headstone reads, ‘Memoria in Aeterna’, meaning, ‘in eternal remembrance’.

20.8.18 Private Alfred Riches

Private Alfred Riches

Private Alfred Riches of the 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 39 years old. Alfred is buried in CWGC Fouquescourt British Cemetery, France.

Alfred was the son of Alfred and Hannah Riches, of King's Lynn, Norfolk, England, and was the husband of Kate Riches, of 11 Mintern Avenue, Brantford, Ontario, Canada. Before the war Alfred worked for Massy Harris, the tractor manufacture, and his name appears on the company war memorial outside of their former head office at King Street West, Toronto. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘His loss we do mourn, yet we know he’s above, waiting for those whom on earth he did love’.

19.8.18 Private Jesse Barmby

Jesse BarmbyPrivate Jesse Barmby of the 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, was killed 100 years ago today by enemy shell fire near the French village of Hattencourt, on the Western Front. He was 33 years old. He is buried in CWGC Warvillers Churchyard Extension.

Born in Yorkshire, Robert was the youngest of four sons of Thomas Barmby, of Thwing, near Filey in Yorkshire. Before the war Robert traveled to Canada and lived in the Lang district of southern Saskatchewan, working as a labour. Jesse suffered from asthma and when he was drafted in 1918, he didn't think he would pass the medical exam, however he was accepted. He was killed in action less than a month after arriving in France. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words, ‘ASLEEP IN JESUS’.

18.8.18 Private Henry NorwestHenry Norbet

Private Henry Norwest of the 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, was killed by a sniper on the Western Front 100 years ago today. He was 30 years old. He is buried in Warvillers Churchyard Extension, France.

Born in Fort Saskatchewan, in Alberta, Canada, Henry was the son of Genevieve Norwest of Sacred Heart, Alberta. During his service he became a decorated sniper and was credited with 115 kills.

Click here to discover his story.

18.8.18 Private Robert Moyes

Private Robert Moyes

Private Robert Moyes of the 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, was killed in action 100 years ago today. He was 19 years old. He is buried in CWGC Fouquescourt British Cemetery, France.

Robert was the son of Mrs. E. Moyes of Calgary, Alberta. In 1924, she paid for a short piece in the Calgary Herald in memory of Robert. It said, “’A silent thought a secret tear, keeps his memory ever dear,’ Inserted by his loving Mother and Jack and Jim”

17.8.18 Captain Charles Pavitt

Captain Charles Pavitt

Captain Charles Pavitt of the 18th Divisional Train, Army Service Corps, died 100 years ago today. He was 35 years old. Charles died in hospital after battling influenza for three months. He is buried at Putney Vale Cemetery and Crematorium, London.

Charles was the son of Joseph and Annie Pavitt, of Wimbledon Common, London, and the husband of Josephine Pavitt. He had worked in the London Stock Exchange before volunteering for military service. He served on the Western Front from July 1915, and during his service was awarded the Military Cross.

16.8.18 Lance Corporal Joseph Bloxham

Lance Corporal Joseph Bloxham

Lance Corporal Joseph Bloxham of the 19th (Central Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 23 years old. He has no known grave and is commemorated by the CWGC on the Vimy Memorial.

Joseph was the son of Leonard and Mary Summers Bloxham, of Allandale, Ontario. Joseph’s older brother, Sapper William Bloxham, died on the 1 February 1919, while serving with the Canadian Railway Corps. There is a street named after the brothers in Barrie, Canada.

15.8.18 Captain David McAndie

Captain David McAndie

Captain David McAndie of the 10th (Canadians) Battalion, Canadian Infantry, died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 31 years old. David is buried in CWGC Cerisy-Gailly Military Cemetery, France.

Born in Portmahomack, Scotland, David was the son of James and Helen McAndie. He served in the ranks where he won the Military Medal and the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He then received a battlefield commission and was made an officer. He went on to win the Military Cross and was Mentioned in Dispatches. Upon his headstone are inscribed the words chosen by his Mum and Dad, ‘Ever fondly remembered’.

14.8.18 Major Leonard Drummond-Hay

Major Leonard Drummond-HayMajor Leonard Drummond-Hay of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) died 100 years ago today on the Western Front. He was 23 years old. Leonard is buried at CWGC Bouchoir New British Cemetery.

Born in Vancouver, Leonard was the son Edward Drummond-Hay, of Kitscoty, Alberta, Canada. He had won the Military Cross during the Battle of the Somme in 1916, and had achieved the rank of Major by the age of just 22. Had he lived, he would have become Earl of Kinnoull, Perthshire, Scotland. Leonard’s younger brother, Lieutenant Eric Drummond-Hay, was killed in action on 2 September 1918.

13.8.18 Sergeant Robert Spall, VCSergeant Robert Spall

Sergeant Robert Spall of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment), was killed in action at Parvillers-le-Quesnoy, France, 100 years ago today. He was 28 years old. Born in Ealing, Middlesex, England, Robert was the son of Charles and Annies Maria Spall. He has no known grave and is commemorated by the CWGC on the Vimy Memorial.

For his actions on the day he died, Robert was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

Click here to read an account from the London Gazette on his CWGC page

Private Sydney Ness12.8.18 Private Sidney Ness

Private Sidney Ness of the 50th Battalion, Australian Infantry, died 100 years ago today during the Battle of Amiens. He was 31 years old. Sidney is buried in CWGC Bronfay Farm Military Cemetery, France.

Sidney was the son of Hugh and Susan Ness of Warrow, South Australia. Sidney’s headstone inscription reads, ‘In fond memory of one dearly loved, son of Mr. & Mrs. Ness of Warrow’.

12.8.18 Captain Eric McNair, VC

Eric McNairCaptain Eric McNair of the 9th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment died 100 years ago today in Italy. He was 24 years old. Eric is buried in CWGC Staglieno Cemetery, Genoa.

Born in India, Eric was the son of George Burgh McNair and Isabella Frederica McNair, of Harrington Street, Calcutta. During the First World War he was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Ypres in 1915, was wounded during the Battle of the Somme in 1916, and then insisted that he return to the front. Still ill from his wounds, he died soon after arriving in Italy to take up a staff posting.

Click here to discover his story
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11.8.18 Corporal Edward ChaseCorporal Edward Chase

Corporal Edward Chase served with the Royal Engineers, attached to the 21st Brigade of the Royal Garrison Artillery, Signal Section. He died 100 years ago today during the Battle of Amiens. He was 27 years old. He is buried in CWGC Heath Cemetery, Harbonnieres.

Edward was the son of Edward and Amelia Chase of Sussex. His headstone inscription reads, ‘For ever with the Lord’.

 

10.8.18 Major Thomas RingwoodMajor Thomas Ringwood

Major Thomas Ringwood died 100 years ago today on the Western Front during the Battle of Amiens. He was 31 years old. He was the Chief Instructor at the Royal School of Artillery at Kingston, Ontario, Canada, before serving in France with the 14th Brigade of the Canadian Field Artillery. Thomas is buried in CWGC Cerisy-Gailly Military Cemetery.

He was the son of Cora Castle of British Columbia, and John Ringwood of Ireland. The inscription on Thomas’s headstone, “VINCIT QUI PATITUR”, is Latin for “Who Endures Conquers”.


Private Guthrie Andrew

9.8.18 Private Guthrie Andrew

Private Guthrie Andrew fought with the 58th Battalion of the Australian Imperial Force on the Western Front. Guthrie died 100 years ago today during the Battle of Amiens. He was 30 years old. He is buried in Heath Cemetery, Harbonnieres.
He was the son of William Smith Andrew and Mary Andrew. His headstone states the place of his birth…“BORN AT MONKTON, AYRSHIRE, SCOTLAND 30. IV. 1888”

Lieutenant Reginald Hingston

8.8.18 Lieutenant Reginald Hingston

Lieutenant Reginald Hingston of the 24th Battalion (Victoria Rifles) Canadian Infantry, was killed in action 100 years ago today during the Battle of Amiens. He was 33 years old. He is buried in CWGC Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery.

Reginald’s son Basil was three when his father died. Basil served during the Second World War and was killed in action in September 1944 during Operation Market Garden. Basil is buried in CWGC Arnhem Oosterbeek War Cemetery