29 June 2017

Rededication service for Able Seaman Reginald Cecil Evenden

A rededication service for Able Seaman (AB) Reginald Cecil Evenden was held yesterday after the CWGC provided a new headstone bearing his name.

 

The 23-year-old died along with 53 comrades when their warship, HMS Recruit, was sunk on 9 August 1917.

For almost 100 years, Reginald has been buried as an “Unknown British Seaman of the Royal Navy”. Following research conducted by a member of the Danish public, which was investigated and verified by the MOD’s Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre (JCCC), part of Defence Business Services, it was possible to link the unknown sailor to HMS Recruit.

Church records indicated an English sailor was buried in Hune Parish churchyard by the parish priest on 9 September 1917. The records state on his wedding ring finger he was wearing a gold ring with the letters “R.C.E” engraved on the outside. Inside the ring was another inscription – “Dear Mother died 10 June 1915”, vital detail that could only be linked to Reginald.

His grave was rededicated at Hune Churchyard, northern Jutland, Denmark, yesterday during a service conducted by the Reverend Richard Rowe, Royal Navy, after the Commission provided a new headstone.

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