29 June 2017

Rededication service for Able Seaman Reginald Cecil Evenden

A rededication service for Able Seaman (AB) Reginald Cecil Evenden was held yesterday after the CWGC provided a new headstone bearing his name.

 

The 23-year-old died along with 53 comrades when their warship, HMS Recruit, was sunk on 9 August 1917.

For almost 100 years, Reginald has been buried as an “Unknown British Seaman of the Royal Navy”. Following research conducted by a member of the Danish public, which was investigated and verified by the MOD’s Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre (JCCC), part of Defence Business Services, it was possible to link the unknown sailor to HMS Recruit.

Church records indicated an English sailor was buried in Hune Parish churchyard by the parish priest on 9 September 1917. The records state on his wedding ring finger he was wearing a gold ring with the letters “R.C.E” engraved on the outside. Inside the ring was another inscription – “Dear Mother died 10 June 1915”, vital detail that could only be linked to Reginald.

His grave was rededicated at Hune Churchyard, northern Jutland, Denmark, yesterday during a service conducted by the Reverend Richard Rowe, Royal Navy, after the Commission provided a new headstone.

Latest News

The CWGC cemetery containing the graves of First World War poets Lance Corporal Francis Ledwidge and Private Ellis Humphrey Evans – better known as Hedd Wyn – is being restored a century after their deaths.

Today, 21 February, marks 101 years since the sinking of the SS Mendi and is also South Africa’s Armed Forces Day. The sinking was one of the worst maritime disasters in British waters, and among the darkest moments of South Africa’s war. The number of lives lost was second only to the casualties suffered by the South African Brigade at Delville Wood during the Battle of the Somme in 1916.

The Commission has begun a project to document, restore and preserve its unique memorials in Africa.