31 August 2017

Boris Johnson attends Abuja Memorial dedication service

Boris Johnson MP joined UK and Nigerian officials at a dedication service for the new Abuja Memorial in Nigeria today.

 

The memorial was constructed by the CWGC last year to honour more than 2,000 African servicemen who died in the First and Second World Wars.

Designed by the Commission’s architect Barry Edwards, the monument incorporates original bronze panels and statues from memorials built in Lagos in 1932 and 1962.

During the service, the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs cut a ceremonial ribbon, laid a wreath at the memorial and delivered a speech alongside Foreign Affairs Minister of Nigeria Geoffrey Onyeama.

Richard Hills, CWGC Director Africa and Asia Pacific Area, said: “One of the CWGC’s founding principles is, and remains, equality in commemoration. All who served and died, regardless of their rank, their faith or their colour will be remembered. Today’s event reaffirms our commitment to honour that pledge.

“This memorial reminds us of the importance of the First and Second World War campaigns in Africa, of the huge sacrifice and contribution made by Africans in both conflicts and our determination to honour their memory for ever.

“The CWGC is hugely grateful to the Nigerian authorities and people, and the British High Commission in Nigeria for their help in making today’s event possible. You have made it possible for us to honour these men with true dignity and we thank you.”

Read The Abuja Memorial – then and now for more about the new monument.

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