Find War Graves: France | French War Memorials

Use our search tool to find war graves and war cemeteries in France. 

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission cares for graves and cemeteries in 2,945 locations across France. Search for sites to visit and learn more about the French memorials commemorating the men and women of the Commonwealth who died during the first and second world wars.

Information for visitors

Due to the ongoing travel restrictions around Covid-19, please be aware that visiting a CWGC cemetery or memorial may not always be advisable. Please abide by the local advice for the region you wish to visit.

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Where are the War Graves in France?

We care for memorial sites and graves in 2,945 locations across France.

Located in the heart of the battlefields of the First World War, The CWGC Experience is an easy drive away from some of the most recognisable locations on the Western Front.

The CWGC Experience is a unique visitor attraction in Beaurains, near Arras in France that shines a light on the work of the remarkable organisation at the heart of remembrance of the war dead. See behind the scenes work and take a free audio guide of our work.

War Graves France WW1

Our sites include 1,669 locations commemorating lives lost during the First World War.

War Graves France WW2

And 1,563 locations remembering the war dead of the Second World War. 

Thiepval Memorial through time

Famous French War Memorials

Discover more information about some of the well-known memorial sites under our care. 

Thiepval Memorial

The Thiepval Memorial, the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, bears the names of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave.

The memorial also serves as an Anglo-French Battle Memorial in recognition of the joint nature of the 1916 offensive and a small cemetery containing equal numbers of Commonwealth and French graves lies at the foot of the memorial.

The memorial, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, was built between 1928 and 1932 and unveiled by the Prince of Wales, in the presence of the President of France, on 1 August 1932.

There is currently restoration work taking place at this site, however, the cemetery remains open. 

Arras Memorial

The Arras Memorial is one of two memorials to the missing at Faubourg D’Amiens Cemetery. It commemorates close to 35,000 casualties from the United Kingdom, South Africa and New Zealand who died in the Arras offensive of 1917 as well as German attacks in the area during 1918. 

It stands adjacent to the Arras Flying Services Memorial which commemorates almost 1000 airmen who were killed in action over the Western Front while flying for the Royal Flying Corps, the Royal Navy Air Service and the Royal Air Force. 

Both memorials were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and were unveiled on 31 July 1932 by the then Marshal of the Royal Air Force Lord Trenchard. 

Canadian National Vimy Memorial

The Canadian National Vimy Memorial stands at the highest point of Vimy ridge, which was a key strategic point during the Battle of Arras. The ridge was won on 9 April 1917 by four divisions of Canadian corps and so became the perfect place to build a Canadian memorial following the war. 

The memorial is a memorial to all of the Canadians who served during the First World War and bears the names of each Canadian who died in France, and 60,000 in total. It also bears 11,000 names of Canadian soldiers who died in France and have no known grave. 

The memorial was unveiled in July 1936 by King Edward VIII. 

World War One Memorials in France

Other notable World War One Memorials include;

Loos Memorial

Villers-Bretonneux Memorial

Le Touret Memorial

World War Two Memorials in France

Notable World War Two Memorials include;

Bayeux Memorial

Dunkirk Memorial

Headstones at Etaples Military Cemetery

Largest War Cemeteries in France

Explore some of the largest French war and military cemeteries we care for.

Etaples Military Cemetery 

Removed from the Western Front, the area around Etaples was used mainly as an area for sick and wounded troops. A number of hospitals were positioned in the area, caring for around 22,000 patients. 

As such, Etaples Military Cemetery is one of the largest CWGC cemeteries in France, with 10,771 Commonwealth burials from World War One, and 662 non-Commonwealth burials. The cemetery was also used for burials during the early stages of World War Two until the evacuation in 1940, with further burials made after the war. In total, there are 119 Second World War burials here. 

St. Sever Cemetery Extension 

During the First World War, the city of Rouen was used as a base of operations by the Allied soldiers, using it as a supply base depot, General Headquarters and a number of hospitals. 

The casualties from these hospitals were buried in cemeteries around the city, with a large number buried in St. Sever Cemetery and its extension, which was begun in 1916. There are just over 3000 burials in the cemetery, with a further 8685 burials in the extension. 

Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery

Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery is named after a small, red bricked, red tiled café which stood in the area and was destroyed during the opening years of the war. It lent its name to the sector of the front line, and a communications trench used by troops to get to the front line trenches. 

The cemetery was begun in 1916 when soldiers fighting in the area began burying their comrades and was further expanded after the war as soldiers buried in the area were brought together at the cemetery.

This was an area of the front line that saw heavy fighting, and so the cemetery is one of the largest in France, containing more than 7,650 World War One burials, more than half of which remain unidentified. 

Stone of Remembrance at Caterpillar Valley Cemetery

Famous French Battles

Many significant battles took place in France during the world wars. Learn about some of the battles and memorial sites remembering the fallen. 

Battle of the Somme

Fought between July and November 1916, the Battle of the Somme was one of the defining events of the Great War. An estimated 3.5 million men took part in the battle in 1916. By its end, well over one million had become casualties.

Memorial cemeteries include;

D-Day and the Battle of Normandy

6 June 1944 saw one of the key moments of World War Two. It was on this day that the Allies launched their invasion of mainland Europe: Operation Overlord. That day, and the days that followed, saw intense fighting on the beaches and then through the Normandy countryside where over 200,000 Allied soldiers lost their lives. 

Cemeteries include:

Evacuation of Dunkirk

The evacuation of Dunkirk is one of the most well known operations of World War Two. Known officially as Operation Dynamo, the mass evacuation of Allied forces from the port of Dunkirk carried out by military vessels and a flotilla of ‘Little Ships’ - a mixture of fishing boats, merchant vessels and privately owned ships - rescued more than 300,000 soldiers from beaches of France. 

Memorials and cemeteries include: 

Find more war graves, war memorials and cemeteries around the world through our database.

The Ieper Information Centre

The perfect starting point when visiting the cemeteries and memorials of the Western Front.

Ieper Information Centre
The CWGC Experience

No trip to the Western Front would be complete without seeing our visitors centre in Arras, France.

The CWGC Experience